Oklahoma

Thu
06
Sep

Oklahoma: Numbers suggest medical cannabis supply could exceed demand

It is now legal, and it appears there is enthusiasm for medicinal marijuana in Oklahoma.

Only a few days after the state began accepting commercial license requests, more than 1,100 applications to grow, process or dispense marijuana were crammed into the mailbox of the Oklahoma Medical Marijuana Authority within the State Department of Health.

Given the early numbers, supply would exceed demand. By Aug. 31, the state had received just 2,200 patient and caregiver license applications to use medicinal marijuana. Of those, 844 were already approved, but only 45 commercial applications had been processed. Random people visiting downtown who spoke to the Tahlequah Daily Press Wednesday said they were ready to see medicinal marijuana in action.

Tue
04
Sep

Oklahoma: Most doctors won't sign medical marijuana recommendations. Here's why, plus a list of those who will

Would-be patients in the Tulsa area have few options for providers able and willing to sign medical marijuana recommendations, and that may be due to major health care systems telling their doctors not to talk to patients about cannabis treatment options.

Tue
28
Aug

Oklahoma begins medical marijuana approval process, issuing first patient licenses

It was a big weekend in the Sooner State, as Oklahoma began issuing its first medical marijuana patient licenses.

Cannabis has been a pressing issue in Oklahoma lately. Earlier this summer, voters approved the legalization of medical marijuana. Since then, the state has been moving fast to implement the new program.

As Oklahoma begins the medical marijuana approval process, issuing its first patient licenses, the state has taken a big step toward making medical marijuana a reality.

Fri
24
Aug

Oklahoma physicians express concerns about medical marijuana

Enthusiasm for Oklahoma's medical marijuana laws could be tempered by hesitant doctors who will be responsible for recommending the drug to patients.

Two medical professionals told a legislative working group Wednesday that they want stricter medical marijuana regulations in the state. But nearly a dozen residents followed the comments saying the physicians aren't knowledgeable about the benefits of cannabis.

The doctors say evidence on marijuana benefits is largely anecdotal because there isn't much research on the substance. Patient advocates say there's plenty of marijuana-related research in professional medical databases.

Thu
23
Aug

Judge denies petition to block state health department's medical marijuana rules

Cleveland County residents suing the state Department of Health over medical marijuana have lost their bid to get an injunction stopping the state from implementing the new program using recently passed emergency rules.

District Judge Michael Tupper denied the request for an emergency injunction Tuesday morning, a spokesman for the Attorney General's Office said.

The petition for an injunction — filed on behalf of eight Oklahoma residents who are perspective medical marijuana patients and business operators — sought to stop the rules on grounds that the health department's “arbitrary and capricious rules” deny them either proper access to medical care and treatment or threaten their economic and business interests, according to multiple filings.

Tue
21
Aug

Recreational cannabis petition in Oklahoma fails with a lack of signatures

A petition drive to get recreational cannabis on an Oklahoma ballot didn’t receive the required number of signatures, announced Secretary of State, James Williamson on Monday.

Green the Vote, an organization in Oklahoma whose sole purpose is to legalize cannabis in the state, was only able to collect 102,814 signatures of the 123,725 valid signatures necessary to get recreational marijuana on the ballot.

The organization’s other petition which would amend the state constitution to authorize medical cannabis failed to reach the minimum number of signatures with only 95,176 submitted.

Tue
21
Aug

Marijuana authority establishes call center to answer medical marijuana questions

Oklahoma Medical Marijuana Authority has established a call center to answer questions about patient and business application processing and requirements for obtaining medical marijuana licenses.

A new phone number, (405) 522-6662, has been established to get information about the program. The OMMA call center is available to answer questions from prospective patients, caregivers and businesses. 

Hours will be 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday. Staff will be trained to provide information on application instructions and licensure processes and timeframes.

Thu
16
Aug

Officers voice concerns over lack of framework for medical marijuana regulation

On Wednesday, members of law enforcement agencies from across Oklahoma voiced their concerns to lawmakers about medical marijuana.

"We think our DUIs will double because of this," Kay County District Attorney Brian Hermanson said.

From police officers to district attorneys, law enforcement officials had plenty to say now that medical marijuana is legal in Oklahoma, thanks to the passage of State Question 788.

Hermanson said, for edible medical marijuana, state officials need to make sure the packaging clearly states that it contains something that is not regular food.

"There is no reason why this medicine, marijuana should look appetizing to children," Hermanson said.

Fri
10
Aug

Medical marijuana: Not on campus, OU, OSU say

Oklahoma State University and the University of Oklahoma are telling students that even if they become licensed medical marijuana patients in the state’s new legal program, they may not possess or use marijuana on campus.

According to a joint news release from OSU and OU, it is because the schools receive federal funding that they must ban marijuana, still an illegal drug at the federal level, even for state-sanctioned patients.

Thu
09
Aug

Without cannabis testing, OSDH warns 'buyer beware'

Commissioner of Health Tom Bates told lawmakers Wednesday he's worried about consumers buying tainted marijuana because there are no testing requirements in current law.

The first set of rules adopted by the Board of Health included precise testing and laboratory regulations, but the revised rules now in effect as State Question 788 goes live are silent on the issue.

That could lead to cannabis being sold that hasn't been tested at all for things like pesticide or other things that would contaminate the product, Bates said.

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