Oregon

Fri
21
Jan

An inside look at the humanitarian crisis within illegal marijuana grows

cannabis

As local law enforcement makes one illegal marijuana bust after another they’re also finding human victims at the grow sites themselves. Law enforcement has confirmed much of the illegal cannabis activity in our region is from international cartels. But it’s not just the plants, money, and weapons that local, state, and federal officials are after.

It’s a plant that makes a lot of profit. But it also has a dark side. We’re talking marijuana and it’s not the legal kind.

“As the number of these operations has grown, the number of workers has grown as well, which increases the propensity for this to take place,” said Special Agent in Charge Robert Hammer. SAC Hammer oversees the Homeland Security Investigations operations in the Pacific Northwest.

Fri
14
Jan

‘Talk about clusterf---’: Why legal weed didn’t kill Oregon’s black market

illegal grow farm

Legalization was supposed to take care of the black market. It hasn’t worked out that way.

The first unlicensed cannabis grow popped up near Gary Longnecker’s remote Southern Oregon home seven years ago. Now there are six farms surrounding the densely-forested property.

“Last night I woke up at 12:30 with gunshots. [Then again] this morning, seven o’clock,” Longnecker said as he and I walked his land in November.

“That’s them intimidating all of us neighbors to keep out of their face.”

Wed
12
Jan

Oregon State research shows hemp compounds prevent coronavirus from entering human cells

covid 19

Hemp compounds identified by Oregon State University research via a chemical screening technique invented at OSU show the ability to prevent the virus that causes COVID-19 from entering human cells.

Findings of the study led by Richard van Breemen, a researcher with Oregon State’s Global Hemp Innovation Center, College of Pharmacy and Linus Pauling Institute, were published today in the Journal of Natural Products.

Hemp, known scientifically as Cannabis sativa, is a source of fiber, food and animal feed, and multiple hemp extracts and compounds are added to cosmetics, body lotions, dietary supplements and food, van Breemen said.

Wed
12
Jan

How Much Cannabis Can You Legally Possess In Oregon? New Rules Taking Effect In 2022

Oregon

As of Jan. 1, Oregonians can legally purchase up to two ounces of cannabis flower from licensed retailers, NORML reports.  In a Dec. 28 meeting, Oregon's Liquor and Cannabis Commission approved new rules, including doubling how much marijuana customers can purchase and giving the green light to home delivery across city and county lines, among other issues. (Click here for Benzinga article.)

The new provisions are expected to help streamline oversight of the industry, reduce violence and help keep children from accessing hemp products containing THC, the agency said.

Wed
12
Jan

‘Something’s not right in southern Oregon’: alarm at rise of illegal pot farms

truck

Armed men in pickup trucks rule over vast illicit industry that has transformed rural counties, depleting water and scaring locals

Christopher Hall parks his old Toyota on a dirt road that dead-ends in a forest in Oregon’s Illinois Valley. He points out a cluster of greenhouses surrounded by piles of trash, and the hillside above, which has been terraced and entirely stripped of vegetation. Guard dogs run through a small clearing, barking at us.

Fri
07
Jan

Oregon Cannabis Commission to Implement New Rules Through 2022

plant

The Oregon Liquor and Cannabis Commission has spent the last 18 months crafting new rules to improve the state’s cannabis industry.

The OLCC announced in a December 28 press release that it would be implementing new cannabis rules that will take effect between 2022 and 2023. Steve Marks, OLCC executive director, addressed the need for these changes, expressing the desired outcome after the changes go live. 

“These rules try to balance a number of different concerns—consumer health and safety, interests of small and large operators in our industry and public safety concerns around loopholes in the Federal Farm Bill of 2018, and the illicit farm production taking place in Oregon,” Marks said. 

Fri
17
Dec

Awash in illegal cannabis farms, Oregon plans millions for relief

cannabis grow

The Oregon Legislature has dedicated $25 million to combat the proliferation of illegal marijuana farms in Oregon

Theft of water during a drought. The exploitation of immigrant laborers. Intimidation of residents by armed criminals.

A Democratic state senator from southern Oregon said his region, awash in illegal marijuana farms that are protected by gunmen, is starting to look more like a failed state.

After hearing him and others testify this week, the Oregon Legislature dedicated $25 million to help police, sheriff’s offices and community organizations pay for the ballooning costs of cracking down on the thousands of industrial-scale, illegal cannabis farms. Residents said the assistance is welcome but not enough.

Tue
14
Dec

Legislature Approves Funding To Combat Illegal Cannabis Operations

oregon state

On Monday, the Oregon State Legislature approved funding to combat illegal cannabis operations in the state.

SB 893 provides $25 million to local law enforcement agencies to address unlawful marijuana cultivation or distribution operations.

Senate Republican Leader Tim Knopp said, “It’s clear that law enforcement needs more help to stop these dangerous illegal operations. This package gives our county partners the resources they need to hire the law enforcement and water masters to oversee the huge task they have in front of them”.

Wed
08
Dec

Shango Dispensaries Take on Breast Cancer Fight

pink ribbon

Last month, Shango continued its battle against breast cancer armed with generous donations from the company, its customers and its employees in three states. Shango began supporting breast cancer charities five years ago at its dispensary in Portland, Oregon, and has since expanded its fundraising efforts to communities in Nevada and California.

“Shango believes in building long-term relationships with purposeful local charities,” said Shango Controller Julie Dubocq. “

We seek out charities in the same communities as our dispensaries. This helps us get to know the people who work for each charity and become directly involved in its mission and fundraising.”

Tue
30
Nov

Police clearance rates for violent crimes improves after cannabis legalization: Study

arrest

"Legalization may contribute to an environment that positively affects police officers’ performance in solving serious crimes."

Police solved more violent crimes in Oregon after cannabis was legalized, states a new study from The International Journal of Drug Policy.

Oregon legalized cannabis in 2014 and the study tracked crime reports from 2007 to 2017.

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