Oregon

Tue
25
Jun

Good hemp seed or 'garbage'? Growers say standards needed

A unit of wheat is a called a bushel, and a standard weight of potatoes is called a century. But hemp as a fully legal U.S. agricultural commodity is so new, a unit of hemp seed doesn't have a universal name or an agreed-upon quantity.

That's one example of the startling lack of uniformity -- and accountability -- in an industry that's sprung up almost overnight since the U.S. late last year removed hemp from the controlled substances list.

A global hemp research lab announced June 13 in Oregon, coupled with a nascent national review board for hemp varieties and a handful of seed certification programs nationwide, are the first stabs at addressing those concerns -- and at creating accountability by standardizing U.S. hemp for a global market.

Tue
25
Jun

With Senate approval, Oregon looks forward to interstate cannabis commerce

Since Oregon legalized recreational cannabis in 2014, the state’s government has been distinctly pot-friendly… maybe even a little too pot-friendly. But the state, which legalized medical cannabis 1998 and decriminalized small-time possession in 1978, is now attempting to pass more pioneering legislation and write into law the ability to import and export cannabis between states.

Tue
18
Jun

Legal weed destroyed medicinal marijuana program in Oregon. Could it happen here?

When states legalize pot for all adults, long-standing medical marijuana programs take a big hit, in some cases losing more than half their registered patients in just a few years, according to a data analysis by the Associated Press.

Much of the decline comes from consumers who, ill or not, got medical cards in their states because it was the only way to buy marijuana legally and then discarded them when broader legalization arrived. But for people who truly rely on marijuana to control ailments such as nausea or cancer pain, the arrival of so-called recreational cannabis can mean fewer and more expensive options.

Tue
18
Jun

OSU to launch major hemp research center

Oregon State University’s Global Hemp Innovation Center will be the largest hemp research center in the USA say OSU officials.

Like much of the accelerated activity in the sector, the move by OSU has been triggered by the signing of 2018 Farm Bill that legalized hemp, recognised it as an agricultural crop and removed it from the federal controlled substances list.

“We believe that Oregon State University is uniquely positioned to serve the global need for research-based understanding of hemp as a crop and for its use in new products,” said Alan Sams, dean of the College of Agricultural Sciences.

Wed
12
Jun

Oregon Legislature passes historic Bill to allow cannabis exports

Oregon, with a long history with cannabis, combined with some great weather in the southern part of the state, and relatively low barriers to enter the regulated market, has produced a lot of cannabis since the state legalized cannabis commerce. I mean, a lot. The huge supply of cannabis, a bounty, if you will, has led to rock-bottom prices, creating a cannabis connoisseur’s dream, but has made it exceedingly difficult for producers to make any kind of profit.

Tue
04
Jun

The big freak-out over Oregon’s marijuana surplus

By now many of you have heard the devastating news: There’s too much marijuana in Oregon. Perhaps I should have told you to sit down first; for those who fainted after reading that sentence, my apologies.

All jokes aside, this is apparently a huge deal. State authorities put the surplus from last year’s harvest alone in excess of 2 million pounds of marijuana. With supply outpacing demand in the state, prices have plummeted, putting many businesses in the crosshairs of failure.

Fri
31
May

Oregon, awash in marijuana, takes steps to curb production

Oregon is awash in pot, glutted with so much legal weed that if growing were to stop today, it could take more than six years by one estimate to smoke or eat it all.

Now, the state is looking to curb production.

Five years after voters legalized recreational marijuana, lawmakers are moving to give the Oregon Liquor Control Commission more leeway to deny new pot-growing licenses based on supply and demand.

 

The bill, which passed the Senate and is now before the House, is aimed not just at reducing the huge surplus but at preventing diversion of unsold legal marijuana into the black market and forestalling a crackdown by federal prosecutors.

Thu
30
May

OK to smoke, not to grow? States with legal cannabis wrestle with homegrown pot

Illinois lawmakers working to legalize recreational marijuana have hit a potential snag that other states have wrestled with: whether to allow people to grow a few pot plants for personal use.

The 10 states that have legalized recreational marijuana have different "home grow" rules, with Michigan allowing individuals to grow as many as 12 plants and Washington state not allowing them to grow any.

DID YOU KNOW? "As of July 1, 2015, Oregonians can home grow of up to four plants per residence, regardless of how many people live in the residence. Four adults in one residence does not mean 16 plants. The limit is four per residence," according to the State of Oregon.

Fri
24
May

Oregon Cannabis Export Bill on its way to becoming law

In an unprecedented move, the Oregon will likely be the first state to allow the export of cannabis products across state lines.

After passing the senate with 19-9 vote – 2 republicans and 17 democrats voted in favor – Bill 582 is on its way to the House where it’s expected to easily pass. The Senate vote was said to be the largest obstacle this bill would face, meaning it will likely become law fairly soon.

Thu
16
May

Oregon Senate passes historic cannabis export Bill

In a historic move today, the Oregon Senate voted in favor of a bill that would create a framework to allow Oregon to export cannabis to other states or countries that have also adopted legalization.

After passing with a 19-9 vote, the bill will now advance to the House, where it has already received support from lawmakers in both parties. The Governor’s office has also indicated support for the bill, meaning that today’s Senate vote is likely the largest hurdle the bill will face on its way to becoming law.

Before it would allow exports to occur, the bill requires an indication from the federal government that interstate commercial cannabis transactions won’t be prosecuted under federal law.

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