Zimbabwe

Thu
28
Mar

Hoban Law to take the lead on hemp policy & regulation in Africa?

New Frontier Data say that they  recently presented preliminary findings to the Zimbabwean government while working in collaboration with other regulators in the region to finalize what will be the first “rigorous assessments of both risks and opportunities of hemp cultivation in Africa.”

New Frontier data’s press release goes on to say

The ICA’s invitation-only event brings together industry leaders across the Nine Foundational Pillars of new cannabis markets, to share lessons learned and best practices with regional government officials and stakeholders. 

Tue
26
Mar

Zimbabwe authorizes licence to first medical cannabis company, but drug remains controversial

Zimbabwe recently authorized licenses to grow cannabis for medical or research purposes. Previously, it was illegal to possess, consume or cultivate the plant, with violations leading to harsh penalties of up to 12 years in prison. Now, after many delays in the implementation of the regulations, licenced companies and individuals can grow the plant.

Earlier this month, the country approved the licence for its first medical cannabis company, Precision Cannabis Therapeutics Zimbabwe—located roughly 45 minutes outside Harare—at the cost of USD$46,000 (approx CAD $61,700).

Fri
22
Mar

Africa’s legal cannabis market could be worth over $US 7.1 billion annually by 2023 – Report

Africa’s legal cannabis industry could be worth more than $US 7.1 billion annually by 2023 if legislation is introduced in a number of the continent’s major markets, European-based market intelligence and strategic consultancy firm Prohibition Partners has found in its latest report, released today.

The African Cannabis Report™, published today, finds that countries across the continent could generate significant economic benefits through the development of legal cannabis markets.

Mon
18
Mar

Zimbabwe authorizes license for first medical marijuana company

The African nation of Zimbabwe issued the country’s first license to a medical marijuana company earlier this month, according to a report from Marijuana Business Daily. In a letter obtained by the publication that is dated March 7,  Zimbabwe’s Ministry of Health and Child Care informed Precision Cannabis Therapeutics Zimbabwe that the company’s application to produce medical cannabis had been approved. The letter notes that the authorization was being issued pending payment of a license fee of US$46,000.

Thu
13
Sep

Zimbabwe’s medical marijuana future uncertain

The country is the second in Africa to permit cannabis cultivation, but months after approval there’s been little uptake by farmers and no scientific proposals.

In May, the government of Zimbabwe announced a law that allows farmers to grow and sell cannabis for medical and research purposes. The country becomes only the second in Africa to permit medical marijuana, Lesotho being the first to do so in 2017. 

Mon
21
May

Zimbabwe government suspends cannabis farming licensing

Government has suspended the licensing and growing of marijuana — popularly known as mbanje.

Last month, President Emmerson Mnangagwa’s administration gazetted licence fees for those interested in growing cannabis (mbanje) for research and medicinal purposes.

This was seen as part of strategies to shore up revenue flows to the depressed fiscus.

The development, which had divided opinion in the hugely polarised southern African nation, had made Zimbabwe the second country in Africa to legalise cultivation of the plant after the tiny kingdom of Lesotho announced the continent’s first licence to grow cannabis legally last year.

Until now, it had been illegal to grow, possess or use cannabis in Zimbabwe, with offenders facing up to 12 years in jail.

Mon
30
Apr

Zimbabwe just became the second country in Africa to legalize cannabis cultivation

The Zimbabwean government this week published a licensing regime that will allow the legal cultivation of cannabis, state-owned newspaper The Herald reported on Saturday. 

Growing mbanje, as dagga is commonly known in Zim, will be legal for research and medical use under the new regulations, Statutory Instrument 62 of 2018, "Dangerous Drugs – Production of Cannabis for Medicinal and Scientific Use Regulations".

Zimbabwe has been considering such partial legalisation for the last eight months.

Tue
11
Jul

Zimbabwe: Zim Mulls Legalising Production of Cannabis to Lure Investment

Zimbabwe is considering legalising the production of cannabis for medical purposes to lure investors keen to grow the drug, a cabinet minister says.

Investment Promotion Minister Obert Mpofu says a Canadian firm has applied to the government for a permit to produce the drug, known locally as mbanje, in one of the country's soon-to-be-set-up Special Economic Zones (SEZs).

Numerous inquiries

"We have received numerous inquiries from investors who want to participate in the SEZs and one of them is a big international company that wants to be involved in the production of cannabis," Mpofu was quoted as saying by the state-run Sunday News.

Wed
21
Oct

Dagga in Zanele’s room, says Minister Moyo

THERE was a small amount of marijuana in Zanele Moyo’s room and not the huge cache of empty alcohol bottles initially indicated, higher education minister Jonathan Moyo said on Wednesday.

Zanele, Minister Moyo’s daughter, was found dead in her off-campus flat in South Africa last Saturday. The 20-year-old was a second year student at the University of Cape Town.

Her body arrived in Harare Wednesday ahead of burial at Glen Forest on Friday.

Addressing mourners who included President Robert Mugabe, Minister Moyo said they found a small amount of marijuana when they got into Zanele’s apartment.

According to The Herald newspaper, Minister Moyo said the family had not raised any suspicion of foul play over his daughter’s passing.

Mon
27
Jul

Zimbabwe: Gweru Tout Fined for 'Enjoying Cannabis'

A 19 year old local tout on Monday left the court in stitches when he said he smoked dagga as a way of enjoying himself.

Tulani Madondo of Mtapa suburb was apprehended by police on patrol while smoking a twist of the drug at a corner near N. Richards wholesale.

"I just smoked mbanje (cannabis) as a way of enjoying myself your worship," Madondo told the court.

Magistrate, Judith Taruvinga convicted Madondo for contravening provisions of the Dangerous Drugs Act before finning him $50. If he fails to pay the sum he will spend 20 days behind bars.

In coming up with the sentence Taruvinga considered that Madondo was a first offender but warned him to desist from enjoying activities with criminal implications.

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