Africa

Thu
28
Nov

Cannabis Production In Africa Could Help Local Communities While Rewarding Investors

Read entire article here.

After centuries of different roles, cannabis is poised to take on a new and important purpose in Africa.

The cannabis plant was probably introduced by early Arab or Indian Hindu traders and became an important subsistence crop along with tobacco.

The plant has been long been used on the continent for fiber, rope, medicine, as well as religious and recreational purposes. Smoking pipes uncovered in Ethiopia and carbon-dated to around 1320 showed traces of cannabis.

Fri
22
Nov

With Israel as partner, Africa can turn cannabis into an economic game changer

Africa is asserting itself as a high-potential emerging region for large-scale cannabis grow operations. With South Africa leading the continent’s entry into the market along with the Kingdom of Lesotho and Zimbabwe, savvy investors are jockeying for position. But the future health of the African cannabis industry faces several challenges: maintaining consistent, sustainable product quality, overcoming regulatory uncertainty and promoting social justice are long-term considerations that should inform current decisions.

Wed
16
Oct

Europe could lose more ground in the medicinal cannabis industry

Europe is at risk of losing the market share to Africa in the medicinal cannabis industry, and Eco Equity have spotted the global potential.

There is a reluctance by some European policy and law makers to embrace the economic potential of medicinal cannabis and as a result they are seeing opportunities lost to more progressive markets. Europe could lose more ground following Lesotho and Zimbabwe’s decisions to allow cultivation of medicinal cannabis for mass export.

Wed
18
Sep

The African origins of cannabis culture and how it got to the U.S.

Did you know that the roots of today's cannabis culture can be traced back to the African continent from hundreds of years ago? According to Dr. Chris Duvall, author of The African Roots of Marijuana, the forgotten history of global cannabis culture continues to have contemporary influence, writes Timothy Harris

Thu
05
Sep

Growing medical cannabis is helping Lesotho survive

Marakabei — Vast white greenhouses sit high up on the slopes of Lesotho’s Marakabei town, hidden from view. It’s not fruit or vegetables, however, growing under the 18 plastic covers, but thousands of cannabis plants.

The cannabis is grown legally by the Lesotho-based company Medigrow and is regulated by the government.

“We have three rows that contain 1,200 plants each. That’s 3,600 plants across the whole structure,” said Medigrow’s head of production Albert Theron, gazing proudly over the crop.

In 2017, the tiny landlocked kingdom of 2.1-million people decided to tap into the booming medical marijuana industry, becoming the first country in Africa to allow the cultivation of cannabis for medicinal purposes.

Thu
05
Sep

African foothold for U.K. entrepreneurs in Tandem with Aphria

With the backing of a Canadian cannabis giant two British entrepreneurs have established a new CBD production plant in Africa’s most developed cannabis nation.

Lesotho has a history of illegal cannabis production stretching back centuries and became the first African country to approve medical pot cultivation in 2017. Shortly after legalization Ontario-based Aphria launched a joint venture with U.K. extraction company Verve Dynamics. This JV, known as Cann Invest Africa, aims to export Lesotho CBD to global markets. 

Tue
03
Sep

This small African Nation is the key to tremendous growth for pot stocks

Getting in on the ground floor of a potentially revolutionary venture before it explodes is one of the best ways for pot stocks to grow. That growth may be all at once, or it may be slow and steady, but if the whole sector begins turning towards one trend or one factor that reliably leads to profit, the companies that established an early position in that factor will see the greatest benefit.

This is why Canadian companies are so well-positioned in the cannabis industry. Early legalization allowed corporations across Canada to become first-movers in a number of key markets.

Thu
22
Aug

The next leader in cannabis cultivation across the continent of Africa

Cannabis cultivation has the potential to help Africa advance in more ways than one, and with increasing legalisation across the world, the continent may unlock potential income.

Africa is emerging as a player in the medical cannabis sphere at a spectacular rate and for good reason. It has been estimated that the legal cannabis industry could be worth more than USD 7.1 bn (~€6.2 bn) by 2023 if legislation is implemented across the continent. Does this mean Africa will join other countries across the world in cannabis cultivation, business and conversation?

Mon
05
Aug

Global Cannabis Oil Market expected to exceed US$ 2,468 Million By 2025

Zion Market Research published a new 110+ pages industry research “Cannabis Oil Market by Type (Organic Cannabis Oil and Non-Organic Cannabis Oil) and by Application (Recreational and Medical): Global Industry Perspective, Comprehensive Analysis, and Forecast, 2018–2025” in its database. The global Cannabis Oil Market research report carries an in-depth fundamental framework of the market, which is derived from the analysis of data acquired through various sources.

Fri
12
Jul

Africa’s budding cannabis market

A valuable market is emerging as countries across the world legalise cannabis for medical and recreational use. Shoshana Kedem reports on the opportunities for growers and investors in Africa.

Cannabis has been employed in traditional African herbal medicine since time immemorial. Today, much of the world is playing catch-up.

The multi-billion dollar global cannabis industry is booming as companies cite the benefits of medical marijuana for treating pain and inflammation and possibly even soothing mental illness and addictions. The global legal cannabis market could be worth $272bn by 2028, according to the 2018 European Consumer Staples Report from Barclays. 

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