New Mexico

Wed
06
Oct

Employees seek to add whistleblower complaint to existing suit against NM cannabis regulators

marijuana plant

Four state employees who initially filed a lawsuit against the New Mexico Regulation and Licensing Department over where they were assigned to work have asked the judge in the case to allow more claims to be added. The four plaintiffs filed a motion last week to amend their suit to include allegations that RLD and its Cannabis Control Division violated the state’s Whistleblower Protection Act.

Matilde Colomo, Matthew Peralta, Martinik Gonzales and Jude Vigil claim, in their proposed amended complaint, that their bosses violated state law by ignoring concerns raised by employees regarding an illegal cannabis grow, moldy cannabis and an edible cannabis product that allegedly caused a consumer to have an “adverse reaction.”  

Wed
22
Sep

Las Cruces will pull $150,000 investment out of hemp manufacturing company

marijuana leaf

The Las Cruces city council voted to pay the state back $400,000 that was going to go to a new hemp manufacturing company.

The city planned to invest $150,000 of its own funding in addition to $400,000 that the New Mexico Economic Development Department gave the city for 420 Valley, LLC.

The city's decision to retract the money was due to the fact that 420 valley was unable to meet its hiring goals.

"They we’re going to provide up to 55 jobs at a certain income level by 2023, December 31st," said Las Cruces Mayor Ken Miyagishima. "And then there was also another stipulation that they would have at least 18 jobs by December 31st of 2020 and we don’t believe that they’re going to fulfill that.”

Tue
14
Sep

Recreational cannabis industry sparks struggle for water rights in parched New Mexico

When New Mexico’s recreational cannabis bill was signed into law in April, Mike Hinkle and Ryan Timmermans jumped at the chance to get into the industry. The two business partners, both recent transplants from the South, bought portable buildings, seeds, grow lights and a property in the village of Carson, with a domestic well they thought they could use to irrigate their plants. In total, they invested more than $50,000.

“That’s actually the most money I’ve ever had in my life,” Hinkle said. “I was extremely excited because we thought we had a shot.”

 

Fri
10
Sep

Recreational cannabis industry sparks struggle for water rights in parched New Mexico

New Mexico landscape image

When New Mexico’s recreational cannabis bill was signed into law in April, Mike Hinkle and Ryan Timmermans jumped at the chance to get into the industry. The two business partners, both recent transplants from the South, bought portable buildings, seeds, grow lights and a property in the village of Carson, with a domestic well they thought they could use to irrigate their plants. In total, they invested more than $50,000.

“That’s actually the most money I’ve ever had in my life,” Hinkle said. “I was extremely excited because we thought we had a shot.”

Fri
06
Aug

New Mexico Might Not Have Enough Weed To Open Recreational Sales

New Mexico’s anticipation of a deficit is not paranoia; it is a safe prediction given the precedent set by other states.

When New Mexico started legalizing cannabis, the marijuana community in the state was ecstatic because it marked a new dawn for them. When it finally attained legalized status, the excitement was through the roof, but today it seems like something is threatening that joyful feeling in the state.

 

The trouble with availability

New Mexico faces a looming crisis and may have trouble with marijuana availability. Experts in the state are saying that recreational marijuana products may run out in the first week when sales begin.

Wed
28
Jul

New Mexico’s climate may lend to a smaller carbon footprint when growing cannabis

When the New Mexico Legislature was considering a bill that eventually became the Cannabis Regulation Act, one of the major topics of concern was water use. Ultimately, lawmakers agreed to require cannabis growers to prove they had legal access to water.

Mon
26
Jul

Former New Mexico Police Officer Convicted on Drug Charges

lights on police car

Former police officer Daniel Capeheart has been convicted on drug charges, much to the surprise of New Mexico state.

Former New Mexico State Police Officer Daniel Capehart has recently been convicted on drug charges. 

Specifically, former Officer Capehart was convicted of distributing cannabis and methamphetamine by the state of New Mexcio. The cannabis was allegedly originally intended for a 16-year-old girl he pulled over, according to the recent court case. Further, it is believed this also was part of a separate drug-for-sex scheme with the girl.

Mon
26
Jul

Legal Cannabis Is One Reason Home Prices Are Soaring Right Now

homes representing realestate market

 

A new report suggests having accessible weed can add to your property value.

If you’ve been shopping around for a new home recently, you’ve probably noticed that real estate prices have increased. This is true, particularly in weed-friendly states. But with 91% of American adults who support cannabis legalization, it will only continue to spread throughout the country and there is no doubt it will have an impact on real estate prices.

Wed
21
Jul

Does New Mexico have enough water for cannabis?

Where some see desert, Cid and Medina Isbell see opportunity.

Standing on a plot on their 30-acre property just north of Madrid, they envision a greenhouse full of cannabis plants where brush, sunflowers and cactuses now grow.

They are among many hopeful entrepreneurs who see New Mexico’s upcoming legal market for cannabis production and sales — set to launch by April 1 — as a way to break into a new business with a potential windfall. The Isbells already have raised $200,000 toward their initial budget of $800,000, and they’ve hired a lawyer to help sort out legal issues.

Thu
15
Jul

New Mexico Eyes Higher Plant Limit For Marijuana Producers

A New Mexico regulatory agency hopes to avoid a possible shortage by raising the number of marijuana plants that licensed producers could produce.

The Cannabis Control Division of the state Regulation and Licensing Department last week raised the previously planned per-grower limit of 4,500 plants to 8,000, and producers also would be able to apply for incremental increases of 500 with a total cap of 10,000, the Santa Fe New Mexican reported.

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