Ohio

Wed
13
May

Marijuana debate exclusive: What would you be voting on?

COLUMBUS – If their proposal gets on the November ballot, and is approved by voters, ten people or investment groups will basically own the exclusive right to grow marijuana for legal sale in Ohio.

As their campaign, under the one-word name “ResponsibleOhio”, has gained traction, the people behind those investments (roughly $2 million apiece) have largely stayed behind-the-scenes, until now.

Tue
12
May

Ohio Task force to examine marijuana legalization

Hamilton County Prosecutor Joe Deters disclosed Monday that he has convened a task force to study the impact that marijuana legalization would have on the state of Ohio, its work to be funded by the organization trying to legalize pot in Ohio.

In a written announcement, Mr. Deters said the study group of policy experts and elected officials will research the public health, public safety, and economic impacts of medical and personal legalization. David Little, a spokesman for Mr. Deters, said the other members of the task force will be disclosed when the study is released.

Mon
11
May

Legalized marijuana would not trump employers' drug policies

Ohio could legalize marijuana if a proposed amendment collects enough signatures and is approved by voters.

But those who are looking to light up as soon as the law goes into effect may want to hold off.

According to an analysis of ResponsibleOhio’s proposed constitutional amendment to legalize marijuana in Ohio, employers’ drug policies would still have control over whether or not employees could smoke marijuana.

So if your company has an anti-drug policy, a potential law legalizing marijuana would have little to no impact.

What 2 days worth of filled petition books look like. 250k+ signers and counting. pic.twitter.com/0JCPr1yfA1

Mon
11
May

Former Kroger exec investing in would-be marijuana farm

The former top lawyer at Kroger is investing in the Butler County farm that will grow marijuana if Ohio voters approve a constitutional amendment to legalize the drug.

Mon
11
May

Ohio Legislators look to make push to legalize marijuana difficult

Supporters of three proposals to put legal marijuana in the Ohio Constitution are pushing for a spot on the fall ballot. But there is growing talk of a move by the General Assembly to undercut full legalization.

Sources say legislators want to create a more restrictive alternative to legalizing marijuana in Ohio than what is being proposed by private, for-profit groups as a way to undermine those approaches.

One option is passage of House Bill 33 — a proposal that would legalize cannabis-derived medicines for those with seizure disorders — either in its present form or by slightly expanding it.

Thu
07
May

Ohio The Surprising State That Could Be The Next To Legalize Marijuana

It’s looking more and more likely that voters in a key battleground state will be voting on marijuana legalization in November, and recent polling suggests it could win. That’s this November, not November 2016.

The state is Ohio, where a controversial pot legalization initiative is already well on the way to qualifying for the ballot, and its backers—or should we say investors?–have the cash on hand to make sure it does.

There are pot legalization bills pending in any number of states, and early on, there were hopes this would be the year a state legislature would get around to legalizing it. New England states such as Maine, Massachusetts, and Vermont looked like the best bets, but it now doesn’t seem like it’s going to happen.

Thu
30
Apr

Ohio Union groups say OK to marijuana legalization

If passed, the proposal would create a Marijuana Control Commission that would license 10 farms around the state to grow the crop.

The three largest Ohio branches of the union representing nearly 70,000 retail workers, endorsed Wednesday the ResponsibleOhio initiative to legalize marijuana.

 

"The executive board of these locals, which are made up of rank-and-file members, made a decision to support this proposal because we want to make sure that we have good jobs in the new legal marijuana industry," said Laurie Couch, a spokeswoman for United Food and Commercial Workers.

The majority of the local members work in retail stores, Couch said, including Kroger, Meijer and CVS, as well as in food packing and processing.

Tue
28
Apr

Ohio students invent DUI marijuana testing device

Akron, Ohio — Two Ohio graduate students have invented a device that will allow law enforcement officers to determine whether motorists have used marijuana.

The Plain Dealer reports  that two biomedical engineering graduate students at the University of Akron hope to market their roadside testing device to states where marijuana use has been legalized.

Mariam Crow and Kathleen Stitzlein's device tests saliva to determine the concentration of pot's active chemical in the bloodstream. Police must now wait weeks to get results from blood tests for marijuana use.

Mon
27
Apr

Cincy State president: Yes to legal marijuana in Ohio

Owens also said that if marijuana is legalized, “It is critical that we expunge the records of those who have non-violent criminal records related to marijuana.”

Dr. O’Dell Owens, president of Cincinnati State Technical and Community College and the former coroner for Hamilton County, endorsed on Monday the proposed constitutional amendment that would legalize marijuana in Ohio.

In a statement issued by the legalization campaign ResponsibleOhio, Owens said that as a physician, he believes patients should be able to assess the medical value of marijuana in consultation with their doctors.

Mon
27
Apr

Akron grad students invent device to detect marijuana use

AKRON – Two graduate students have invented a device that would allow law enforcement officers to determine how much THC — the active ingredient in marijuana — is in a motorist's system during traffic stops.

The Plain Dealer reports that two biomedical engineering graduate students at the University of Akron hope to market their roadside testing device to states where marijuana use has been legalized.

Mariam Crow and Kathleen Stitzlein's device tests saliva to determine the concentration of pot's active chemical in the bloodstream. Police must now wait weeks to get results from blood tests for marijuana use.

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