Missouri

Fri
30
Nov

No decision on whether Missouri's poorest can use medical marijuana without losing welfare benefits

 Gov. Mike Parson’s administration has not decided whether thousands of Missouri welfare recipients will lose their benefits if they use medical marijuana.

In response to a series of questions put to administration officials this week, the Department of Social Services, which administers the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families program, said the question remains under review.

“The Department of Social Services is currently studying the issue and will make a decision on how to proceed at the appropriate time,” spokeswoman Rebecca Woelfel told the Post-Dispatch.

Officials, for example, also have not made decisions on whether to bar medical marijuana users from certain state jobs.

Wed
21
Nov

Federal law bans Missourians from using medical marijuana while owning a gun

Right now Missourians who want to get their medical marijuana card would need to need to choose between using the drug or keeping their gun. Keeping both means you run the risk of being arrested because it’s illegal under federal gun laws for any marijuana user to possess a firearm.

Two weeks ago, state voters overwhelming passed Amendment 2, also known as New Approach Missouri, which allows doctors to recommend medical marijuana to patients with serious illnesses.

Spokesperson Jack Cardetti said the new marijuana law had the foresight to protect second amendment rights at the state level.

Mon
19
Nov

Legal questions remain about how medical marijuana will work in Missouri

The clock is ticking on medical marijuana in Missouri, but there’s still a lot people don’t know. Here’s more about the grey areas and what will have to be figured out quickly.

Constitutional amendments go into effect on Dec. 6, but it won’t be legal by then. That’s just when the clock starts ticking on deadlines to accept applications for medical cards and dispensaries.

However, there are things that are not spelled out that a local attorney is closely watching.

Fri
09
Nov

How will Kansas address Missouri's new medical marijuana law?

Many Kansas City metro residents cross the state line between Missouri and Kansas multiple times a day. Now that Missouri has voted to legalize medical marijuana, what will those with legal prescriptions need to know when going into Kansas? 

"We are a metro area with hundreds of thousands of people crossing the state line, so it is something we will have to address," Johnson County District Attorney Steve Howe said Thursday. 

Voters in Missouri spoke loudly at the polls on Tuesday. Medical marijuana will become legal on Dec. 6, and residents must have a prescription to use it. 

Under the current law, any Missouri resident possessing medical marijuana could be arrested after crossing into Kansas, where medical marijuana is not legal, according to Howe.

Tue
06
Nov

8 things to know about Tuesday's Missouri medical marijuana vote

More than two decades after California first made medical marjiuana legal in the United States, Missouri voters will have their say on whether the policy is right for the Show-Me State.

Here's a roundup of things to know ahead of this historic vote.

Tue
30
Oct

Understanding Prop C, the medical marijuana initiative

One of the medical marijuana initiatives on the ballot for voters is Proposition C. Supporters say the ordinance is long overdue and will provide people suffering from medical conditions with easy and affordable access to medical marijuana.

They say Prop C provides the best situation on all fronts. Mark Habbas, a spokesman for Missourians for Patient Care, is asking voters to pass medical marijuana laws. He says if people study the facts, they'll see that Proposition C is the most effective way to do so.

“We set it up to provide the best patient access and we set it up to have the lowest tax because insurance doesn't cover it,” Habbas said. To be clear: Prop C would not legalize the recreational use of marijuana. There are no recreational initiatives on the ballot.

Wed
10
Oct

Missouri's three options for medical marijuana

With Wednesday being the last day to register to vote, here is a look at the three initiatives for medical cannabis.  The potential legalization of medical marijuana in Missouri comes in the form of three options on ballots in November.  

Voters now have less than a month to educate themselves on the differences between the three measures. Missouri could become the 31st state to allow medical marijuana. 

For Missouri Medical Marijuana measures, it was a fierce summer in the courtroom. Dr. Brad Bradshaw who backs Amendment 3, sued to have the other two initiatives thrown off the ballot, challenging the validity of their petition signatures. 

Fri
28
Sep

Marijuana initiatives in the midterms that could change everything

Legalization could be coming to even more states.

In just a few short years, marijuana went from being a taboo recreational drug you “didn’t inhale” at college parties to a legalized resource touted for its ability to improve health and bolster the economy. Highly-publicized marijuana legalization efforts in states like Washington, Colorado, and California have helped forge (often through trial and error) a pathway to legalization that could impact everything from employment to incarceration in the U.S.

Tue
25
Sep

Here are preliminary polling results for every marijuana ballot initiative this November

In a little over a month, Americans will head to the voting booths to vote in a very important midterm election that will have major impact on control of Congress and the Donald Trump presidency.

But there are also some very important marijuana initiatives being voted on as well, and the polls are definitely looking good.

Marijuana Business Daily put together all the available polling data to see how likely all the marijuana ballot initiatives are likely to pass this November. Here were the results.

Mon
17
Sep

Former U.S. Attorney believes ‘enforcement of cannabis laws was immoral.’

As Missourians prepare to vote in November on whether to legalize medical marijuana, proponents have support from someone who used to prosecute federal laws.

Former U.S. Attorney for Kansas Barry Grissom said Saturday that the federal classification of marijuana as a Schedule 1 controlled substance, along with heroin, is “absurd” and he said advocates of marijuana legalization were patriots because they are standing up for individual liberty. As a federal prosecutor, Grissom said, “I soon became a true believer that enforcement of cannabis laws was immoral.” Grissom was the keynote speaker at a conference in Kansas City of the Missouri Cannabis Industry Association.

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