Minnesota

Sat
24
Oct

Medical And Recreational Marijuana Legalization Roundup

This year has been an exciting one for proponents of both recreational and medicinal marijuana legalization efforts. Two states began to allow medicinal use, while two more states and Washington, D.C. have started to permit recreational use. Let’s take a look at the latest in these territories and how laws, regulations and rules have been developed around these measures.

Recreational Use

Oregon

Mon
05
Oct

Qualifying Conditions For Cannabis By State

Alaska

Qualifying conditions to become a medical marijuana patient in Alaska include:

  • Cancer
  • Glaucoma
  • HIV/AIDS
  • Cachexia (wasting syndrome)
  • Nausea
  • Muscle spasms
  • Multiple sclerosis
  • Pain
  • Seizures

For a complete list of qualifying conditions and guidelines, please refer to Alaska’s application for medical marijuana registry

 

Arizona

Qualifying conditions to become a medical marijuana patient in Arizona include:

Sat
26
Sep

Three months in, cannabis users complain of high costs, difficult access

Nearly 90 days since medical cannabis became legal to sell in Minnesota, the young industry is working through some growing pains. While a number of patients express vast improvements in their quality of life after using cannabis, others complain of high costs and trouble getting the drug.

So far, the state has registered 518 patients and 404 health care practitioners. The most common condition among those patients is muscle spasms, followed by seizures and cancer.

But not all approved patients have actually purchased medical cannabis.

Rep. Pat Garofalo, R-Farmington, who sits on the Minnesota Medical Cannabis Task Force, said the law has created even more hurdles for patients suffering from chronic conditions.

Fri
25
Sep

Chronic pain patients plead for access to medical marijuana

Having cancer is a good enough reason to legally take marijuana in Minnesota. Same with epilepsy or AIDS.

But pain so severe it can drive a person to suicide? No way.

That's the No. 1 problem with the state's new medical marijuana law, according to testimony at a hearing Friday at the state Capitol.

"Please add intractable pain to the list," said Jennessa Lea of St. Paul, a single mom who suffers from a body-deterioration condition.

She was one of 12 people who addressed the Task Force on Medical Cannabis Therapeutic Research. The group met to hear public feedback about the medical marijuana law, which went into effect July 1.

Thu
24
Sep

Hemp Legally Harvested in Minnesota for First Time in Over 60 Years

Minnesota hemp was legally harvested Wednesday in Minnesota for the first time in more than 60 years.

The Industrial Hemp Development Act of 2015 allowed researchers from the University of Minnesota to collect wild hemp to be studied. On Wednesday, researchers scoured the overgrown grounds of Fort Snelling for the wild cannabis.

"These belong to the same species as marijuana," Dr. George Weiblen said. "They're treated as controlled substances, by law."

Weiblen and Jonathan Wenger have been studying hemp for more than a decade.

Thu
24
Sep

Patients Continue To Buy Medical Marijuana From The Black Market In Minnesota Due To Cost

There is a trend in America right now when it comes to medical marijuana states. The newer the state, the stricter the program, which then translates to higher prices for medicine. These same states don’t allow patients to grow their own medicine, so patients either have to put up with being price gouged, or go to the black market. Most patients go the black market route. It’s not by choice, but at the end of the day these patients have to take risks and chances because they simply can’t afford to pay the high prices. Minnesota is one of those states. Per KOLO TV:

Mon
21
Sep

Patients in Minnesota opt to buy pot illegally

ST. PAUL, Minn. — Just two months after Minnesota launched its medical marijuana program, some patients turned off by high costs say they are back to buying the drug illegally because it's the only way they can afford it.

State officials and the companies hired to make marijuana products trumpeted the program's medical approach — pills and oils, no leaf products — when it launched in July. But some patients say the highly restricted and regulated system is costing them hundreds or even thousands of dollars a month— none of it covered by insurance.

Mon
21
Sep

Amid high price woes, Minnesota medical marijuana company offers discount on month supply

Amid criticism of high prices for medical marijuana, one of Minnesota's manufacturers on Monday announced a discount for patients buying a month's supply of medicine.

LeafLine Labs' 15 percent discount could mean anywhere between $15 in savings on some of the company's less expensive pills, and as much as a $150 discount on more expensive products, chief executive Manny Munson-Regala said. The shift comes after LeafLine's competitor, Minnesota Medical Solutions, substantially increased its own prices earlier this summer.

Mon
21
Sep

Cost of medical marijuana in Minnesota leads some to return to illegal sources

Just two months after Minnesota launched its medical marijuana programme, some patients turned off by high costs say they are back to buying the drug illegally – because it’s the only way they can afford it.

State officials and the companies hired to make marijuana products trumpeted the programme’s medical approach of pills and oils and no leaf products when it launched in July. But some patients say the highly restricted and regulated system is costing them hundreds or even thousands of dollars a month, none of it covered by insurance.

Mon
21
Sep

Minn. Office of Medical Cannabis tightens security for online registration

Minnesota's Office of Medical Cannabis will not be taking any new applications from patient caregivers, while the staff tightens up the data security of the caregiver registration process.

The temporary freeze comes after a Minnesota resident approached lawmakers Thursday with concerns about a link in an email the Health Department sends to caregivers interested in enrolling in the program so they can pick up cannabis for patients who are too sick or too young to do it themselves. Because the link does not expire quickly, the individual worried that others with access to the email account might be able to open the link and view the personal information the caregiver had submitted to the state -- including their name, address and date of birth.

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