Mexico

Wed
08
Jul

Is Cannabis Legal in Mexico? 3 Things You Need to Know

Ever since the Spanish colonists began farming hemp in Mexico over 400 years ago, cannabis has been a delicate topic in the country – first used as a painkiller, then banned in 1920, and today, almost legal… but also, not at all. The marijuana (or marihuana) rules are hazy, and the consequences of breaking them are no joke. We broke down the top three things you need to know before using cannabis South of the Border.

These laws only apply to the use of cannabis inside the country. Bringing cannabis of any amount or any kind – recreational or medical – across the border into Mexico is considered international drug trafficking, and can lead to arrest.

Thu
04
Jun

Mexico Still Waiting on Its Promised Cannabis Legalization

The Coronavirus has caused much damage to local economies and businesses, as well as triggering the postponement of events of all kinds, from entertainment to business-oriented to political. Such is the case with Mexico, whose government is once again pushing back its promised legislation to govern the legal use of recreational cannabis.

Much like most of the world, cannabis was illegalized in Mexico in the early 1900’s and stayed that way until 2009. In 2009, Mexico decriminalized a range of drugs including cannabis, instituting personal use laws instead. In the case of cannabis, an individual can possess up to five grams, and above this amount can incur prison time.

Fri
08
May

Will Mexico's Independent Weed Market Make a Difference Against the Cartels?

Did you know that it is legal in Mexico to grow up to four plants of weed, have up to 30 grams in the streets and can get caught with up to 200 grams without any major offense happening. Well- that was supposed to be what was going to happen this April – but once again the Mexican Congress shifted their responsibilities and now has a December deadline instead.

Why? The politicians claim that it’s due to the COVID-19 outbreak – however, considering that they had since October of 2018 to come up with a reasonable plan – their excuses are falling on deaf ears. Nonetheless – some people are not waiting for the government to figure out how to move ahead with the cannabis marketplace.

Mon
27
Apr

The 3rd Country to Legalize Marijuana Is... Going to Have to Wait Up to 8 More Months

For much of the past half-decade, marijuana has been one of the fastest-growing industries. After generating $3.4 billion in worldwide sales in 2014, global weed sales more than tripled to $10.9 billion by 2018. According to various Wall Street estimates, worldwide pot sales should hit $50 billion on an annual basis by 2030, with North America generating the bulk of this revenue.

Tue
21
Apr

Marijuana Legalization in Mexico Isn’t Likely in 2020

Marijuana legalization in Mexico looks hazy this year. While the country planned to legalize marijuana in October 2019, issues came up. After a lot of deadline extensions, the country was ready to legalize marijuana by the end of April 2020. However, the Mexican Supreme Court has extended the deadline again. The new deadline is partially due to the COVID-19 pandemic. So, marijuana legalization probably isn’t in the cards for Mexico in 2020.

Mon
23
Mar

Mexican legalization could leave U.S. cannabis companies between a rock and a hard place

Mexico is poised to make some noise in the legal cannabis industry.

With the country set to finalize the legalization of hemp and marijuana next month, Mexico will become the most populous place on the planet to have dropped the ban.

It may also spell bad news for the U.S., which still prohibits the drug at the federal level, as it will now be sandwiched between two countries with full legalization and regulation in place.

Thu
19
Mar

New cannabis law in Mexico criticized as restrictive on hemp

Mexican hemp stakeholders say a new cannabis law moving through the legislative process would significantly hamper hemp interests because it treats hemp the same as marijuana. The new law is now before Mexico’s full Senate after having been passed by the body’s commissions on justice, health and legislative studies.

“There´s no difference between the license that regulates marijuana and the license that regulates hemp,” said Raul Hector Elizalde Garza, a lawyer and President at Hempmeds, Latin America. That will significantly limit the development and sales of low-THC hemp products, Elizalde Garza said.

Tue
10
Mar

Mexican Senate to vote on marijuana legalization bill this week

Mexico’s marijuana legalization bill is gearing up for a vote in the country’s Senate after clearing three key commissions last week.

The Senate commissions of Justice, Health and Legislative Studies approved the draft bill in a vote of 26 against 7, as the April 30, 2020, deadline for the government to legalize cannabis draws closer.

Mexico’s Supreme Court initially granted lawmakers a 6-month deadline to draft legislation for legal weed but handed an extension after the government failed to hash out the framework.

The country’s highest court ruled in October of 2018 that the current ban on marijuana is unconstitutional.

Fri
06
Mar

Mexico Moves One Step Closer To Legalizing Cannabis

The United Commissions of Justice, Health and Legislative Studies of the Senate of Mexico approved a set of rules for the discussion of the legalization of the recreational use of marijuana by people over 18 years in the country. 

"What happened yesterday is that we passed from a ‘pre-ruling ' of sorts to a real set of rules around the discussion of the matter," explains Erick Ponce, president of the Cannabis Industry Promoter Group in an interview with Entrepreneur en Español. “This means that Mexico has just taken a big step around what would be the legalization of cannabis for all uses."

Wed
19
Feb

Countries Around the World Make Moves to Decriminalize Cannabis

In late 2019, a ruling by Italy's highest court struck down the prohibition against growing marijuana at home, ending a long legal dispute over that issue.

The court ruled that “at home, small-scale cultivation activities are to be considered excluded from the application of the penal code,” according to the New York Times.

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