Indiana

Tue
09
Jun

Indiana Hemp Progress Is Slow Growing

More than a year after Indiana lawmakers legalized a so-called cash crop, the coffers are still empty.

Legislation signed into law in 2014 approved the commercial growth and research of the versatile industrial hemp plant, which is a non-intoxicating form of cannabis.

But lack of federal approval has stalled the state from moving forward.

Jamie Petty, the founder of the Indiana Hemp Industries Association, says the plant could be a boon for Indiana agriculture and manufacturing.

“We have empty factories in Anderson and Kokomo that could be converted,” she says. “It becomes the hemp processing plant.”

Tue
09
Jun

Meet the Jewish grand poobah of the First Church of Cannabis

With IRS recognition, gifts are tax deductible for Bill Levin’s new Indianapolis church, which will begin operation the day Indiana’s new Religious Freedom law takes effect

though he grew up at the Reform-affiliated Indianapolis Hebrew Congregation, Bill Levin recently founded a church. And not just any church — the First Church of Cannabis, for which Levin will serve as the Minister of Love.

Tue
09
Jun

Indiana Marijuana Church to Host Alcoholics Anonymous, Narcotics Anonymous Meetings Inside ...

Indiana's First Church of Cannabis, an organization which is expected to test the limits of the state's new controversial religious freedom law by using marijuana recreationally during its services has purchased a former church building as its worship center where it plans to host alcoholics anonymous and narcotics anonymous meetings.

The group's founder, former musician Bill Levin told Indy Star that the new building located in Indianapolis' Eastside area will include a souvenir store and will host the recovery meetings in the basement.

Mon
08
Jun

Indiana Marijuana Church Releases Its Own Ten Commandments; 'The New Deity Dozen'

Grower Steve Jenkins checks out his marijuana plants at the Botanacare marijuana store ahead of their grand opening on New Year's day in Northglenn, Colorado December 31, 2013. The world's first state-licensed marijuana retailers, catering to Colorado's newly legal recreational market for pot, are stocking their shelves ahead of their January 1, 2014, grand opening that supporters and detractors alike see as a turning point in America's drug culture.

Indiana's First Church of Cannabis, a religious organization pushing the boundaries of recreational marijuana use in the state that recently received tax-exempt status has released its own version of the Ten Commandments named "The New Deity Dozen."

Mon
08
Jun

Church of cannabis opens in Indiana though marijuana's use is prohibited

  • The first ever church dedicated to worshiping marijuana has sprouted in Indiana in response to the Religious Freedom Restoration Act (RFRA)
  • The church, founded by Bill Levin, 59, has been deemed a charity and donors can deduct gifts made to the church on their federal tax returns
  • Recreational and medicinal marijuana use is not permitted in Indiana but Levin says since he's not selling it he doesn't think he'll get in trouble
  • Daniel O. Conkle, professor of law at Indiana University said the church will have to prove the religious aspect of smoking marijuana 

 

The first ever church dedicated to worshiping marijuana 'as a health supplement' has sprouted in Indiana.

Mon
01
Jun

IRS Approves First Church Of Cannabis. What's Next For Marijuana?

Welcome to the First Church of Cannabis Inc., approved by Indiana’s Secretary of State under its controversial Religious Freedom Restoration Act. Even bigger that state law approval, the church has even been granted tax-exempt status by the IRS. Tea Party conservatives evidently had a lot more trouble with their tax exemption applications. The stated intent of the upstart church is “to start a church based on love and understanding with compassion for all.”

Mon
01
Jun

Marijuana Church Ruled Tax Exempt

Indiana passed a Religious Freedom Act, which critics say allows discrimination of gay people. However, there is another unintended side effect, where The First Church of Cannabis is now allowed to smoke marijuana and have tax exempt status, even though weed is not legal in the state. Ben Mankiewicz (What The Flick?), Jimmy Dore (The Jimmy Dore Show), and Ana Kasparian (The Point) hosts of The Young Turks discuss.

“Indiana’s marijuana-smoking church has been incorporated as a tax-exempt religious organization by the Internal Revenue Service according to the church’s founder.

Wed
20
May

Hoosiers crowdfund for marijuana access as neighbor states legalize

INDIANAPOLIS – Jennifer Perkins says she feels like she’s on a roller coaster – even while standing still.

Perkins suffers from tuberous sclerosis, a medical condition that’s left small, potato-shaped tumors all over her body, including her brain and kidneys.

Perkins, who shared copies of her medical records with I-Team 8, believes the tumors might be the source of her frequent dizzy spells and seizures.

Her husband, Aaron, posted videos of Jennifer to the online crowdfunding website GoFundMe. The videos, he says, show Jennifer having seizures in their Indianapolis home.

Tue
19
May

Indiana Judge Denies Religious Defense For Medical Marijuana Caregiver

A northern Indiana judge rejected an argument by a man who asked that his marijuana possession charge be reduced from a felony to a misdemeanor because he follows the Rastafarian faith.

Jerome Scott said that he was being charitable to others by cultivating marijuana to ease ailments from chronic back pain to cancer, the South Bend Tribune reports. St. Joseph Superior Court Judge Jane Woodward Miller said he still broke the law.

Fri
15
May

Rastafari couple says marijuana laws unfair to their faith

SOUTH BEND — When a judge this week sentenced Jerome Scott for growing dozens of marijuana plants in his South Bend home last year, the 18 months of probation, a relatively light penalty for a felony conviction, didn’t bother him.

Scott, 30, didn’t even contest the fact that he was growing the weed. But he and his girlfriend, 23-year-old Melanie Schmidt, see the state's marijuana laws as unjust and offered an unusual argument as they fought to have his felony reduced to a misdemeanor.

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