Guatemala

Tue
26
Apr

Why Does The United Nations Find It So Hard To Talk About Drugs?

I have just watched the closing plenary session of the 2016 UN General Assembly Special Session on the world drug problem here in New York. Presidents and Prime Ministers will now move on to the climate change summit that opens tomorrow, and the thousands of government and NGO delegates who have filled the UN building in Manhattan over the last 3 days will catch their flights back to all corners of the globe. So was it worth it – three years of preparation, tens of millions of dollars of travel and meeting costs, and countless hours of debate and negotiation. Is the international community any better placed to reduce the health, social and economic problems associated with illicit drug markets?

Mon
18
May

Latin American Allies Resist U.S. Strategy in Drug Fight

BOGOTÁ, Colombia — Colombia just discarded a cornerstone of the American-backed fight against drugs, blocking the aerial spraying of coca, the plant used to make cocaine. Bolivia kicked out the United States Drug Enforcement Administration years ago and allows farmers to grow small amounts of the crop.

Fri
15
May

Drug Policy Reform in the Americas

Ethan Nadelmann, Executive Director of the Drug Policy Alliance, and a leading advocate for domestic and international drug policy reform, speaking at an April 20, 2015, Vecinos Lecture Series program, "Drug Policy U-Turns in the Americas: Uruguay, Guatemala, and the United States," co-sponsored by the Drug Policy Program and the Latin American Initiative.
Fri
24
Apr

Slideshow: Push to legalize marijuana in Latin America

Two years ago Uruguay became the first country on the planet to okay the use of marijuana. This caused neighboring countries throughout Latin America to rethink their drug policies, and for pro-marijuana supporters to push even hard for legislation to decriminalize weed and make herb smoking and growing a legal act.

While many countries have made it a little easier for casual marijuana smokers to puff freely, there’s still some resistance to all all-out okay to cannabis use.

Click through the slideshow about to see which countries have adopted looser rules regarding marijuana and whether Uruguay will remain the legal-weed country.

Sat
11
Apr

Will legalizing pot affect violence in Latin America?

The debate of whether or not to legalize marijuana in the U.S. is not just a national one, Latin American leaders are weighing in on it too.

That’s because U.S. marijuana consumption drives drug violence in their countries.  Armed Honduran military police escort us to the most dangerous neighborhood in San Pedro Sula, a city dubbed the “murder capital of the world.”

The gang comes in and charges every resident a war tax they call it, it’s simply extortion.  Painful choices for residents: Pay the phony tax, leave or face the wrath of the gangs.

Similar fears haunt communities in other Latin American countries also plagued by violent criminal gangs, whose power is connected to the drug trade.

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