Washington

Wed
16
May

Washington: Despite legalization, marijuana black market hides in plain sight

On a big-sky plateau on the eastern slope of the Cascades, a 10-acre parcel of land has been trashed by illicit pot farmers. Abandoned equipment rusts and jugs of chemicals molder.

Marijuana legalization wasn't supposed to look like this.

Five years into its experiment with legal, regulated cannabis, Washington state is finding that pot still attracts criminals.

Okanogan County Chief Criminal Deputy Steve Brown helped raid this farm last fall. What was striking, he says, is how brazen it was: located just off the road, within sight of neighbors. Before legalization, he says, an operation like this would at least have been hidden up in the hills.

Thu
10
May

BLOCKStrain brings blockchain technology to cannabis

CFN Media Group (“CFN Media”), the leading agency and financial media network dedicated to the North American cannabis industry, announces publication of an article covering Vancouver technology company, BLOCKStrain Technology Corp. (TSX-V:SR.H).

Mon
07
May

Low unemployment rate leads to less testing for marijuana use

According to Friday’s federal report on non-farm payrolls, the unemployment rate in the United States has dropped to 3.9%. Among other things that means its getting harder for employers to find employees and that difficulty is leading to a drop in testing potential employees for marijuana use.

Even the Trump administration has mellowed somewhat. Secretary of Labor Alexander Acosta told a congressional hearing last month that “with all these Americans looking for work … are we aligning our … drug testing policies with what’s right for the workforce?”

Thu
03
May

In Washington, marijuana 'gifts' on the rise

Pop-up pot shops and cannabis confabs have been on the rise in the nation's capital, as would-be marijuana businesses try to find new ways to engage potential customers since Washington legalized the possession of small amounts of the drug three years ago.

Since the district's Initiative 71 went into effect in 2015, people 21 years and up can possess up to two ounces of pot. It's not O.K. to buy it or sell it, but people can transfer up to one ounce of the drug to another person of age ー a practice known as "gifting."

"We gift all the time, but a lot of people who want to get compensated, they have someone buy something else in exchange," said Lisa Scott, founder of the D.C. marijuana edible company Bud Appetit.

Thu
03
May

Small businesses grapple with maze of conflicting pot laws

A low unemployment rate and the spreading legalization of marijuana have led many businesses to rethink their drug testing policies for the first time in decades. A small but increasing number are simply no longer testing for pot.

For small businesses, however, how to handle these challenges may be a tougher call than for bigger corporations. There is a bewildering patchwork of state laws regarding medical and recreational marijuana use.

Mon
30
Apr

The strange patchwork of edibles regulations

Care for some cannabis-infused pumpkin pie? Then hopefully you don’t reside in Washington state, where the government prohibits the sale of marijuana pumpkin pie, custard pie or anything prepared with egg. This is just one of the many peculiar and specific state regulations on edibles that legislators and regulatory boards have put into place in the states where cannabis is legal for adult use.

Mon
30
Apr

Seattle could become the next city to erase marijuana convictions

The City of Seattle has filed a motion with the Seattle Municipal court that would remove marijuana convictions handed down between 1997 and 2010, writes Calvin Hughes.

Thu
26
Apr

Washington state cannabis pesticide tests worry small farms

Washington state marijuana business owners are urging regulators to require cultivators to test adult-use crops for pesticides, a move that has triggered alarm bells among smaller growers.

Some cultivators hope such a move — already adopted in other states — would inspire confidence among consumers and bolster recreational marijuana sales.

But smaller growers — already squeezed by falling prices — worry they wouldn't be able to afford mandatory pesticide testing, which is estimated to cost up to $300 per test. The move also could force small farmers to cultivate fewer strains to keep costs down, although regulators so far have not signaled they will require the testing.

Wed
25
Apr

Just one puff of cannabis ‘could ease depression, stress and anxiety’

After just two puffs patients felt less anxious and after ten puffs they were less stressed.

Washington State researchers assessed how varying levels of chemicals found in marijuana affected people's moods and feelings of wellbeing.

The team found that just a single puff of cannabis high in cannabidiol (CBD) and low in tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), was enough to reduce depression symptoms.

After just two puffs patients felt less anxious and after ten puffs they were less stressed.

Mon
23
Apr

WSU researchers assess use of cannabis in treating stress, anxiety and depression

In a first-of-a-kind study, Washington State University scientists examined how peoples’ self-reported levels of stress, anxiety and depression were affected by smoking different strains and quantities of cannabis at home.

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