Vermont

Tue
22
May

Vermont marijuana: Rules of the road both drivers and passengers should know

Would you? Could you? In a car? Know the pot laws. Here they are: You must not, should not in a car. Police may stop you before you're far.

Okay, all silliness aside, this Dr. Seuss-esque rhyme about Vermont's new marijuana laws, which will take effect July 1, is true. According to Act 86, which was signed by Gov. Phil Scott in January, Vermonters definitely should not use marijuana in a car.

This includes all car occupants. 

According to the law, even if a person is just a car's passenger, he or she can face fines of up to $200 for using marijuana in the car. 

Mon
14
May

Vermont marijuana convention: a deep history of healing and entreprenership

Life-changing personal stories were the driving force behind Vermont's first cannabinoid  entrepreneurs at the first cannabis and hemp convention in South Burlington on Saturday.

"I have a sister who has a seizure disorder, so I really got interested in CBD in 2015 when the farm bill was enacted in Vermont," Kyle Gruter-Curham said at his booth at the back the DoubleTree Hilton's convention room.

Thu
10
May

Vermont employers prepare for legal pot

Many "want ads" in Vermont note that prospective hires must pass a drug-screening test. Potential school bus drivers, air traffic controllers, postal workers and construction workers have long had to provide urine samples to prove they aren't under the influence of substances that could impair their judgment.

But what happens when recreational marijuana becomes legal in Vermont on July 1? Although the new law does not require Vermont employers "to permit or accommodate" its use in the workplace, some businesses are considering their options — both for preemployment screening and overall personnel policies regarding marijuana.

Thu
03
May

Vermont kills bill to tax and regulate recreational marijuana

Many elected officials say it will be resurrected.

A bill to tax and regulate recreational marijuana in Vermont has died, but some legislators believe it’s just a temporary roadblock.

According to Vermont Public Radio, even though elected officials like Winooski Rep. Diana Gonzalez, who said she was optimistic that a tri-partisan coalition of lawmakers had the votes needed to pass the measure, an overwhelming majority of the House voted to kill the legislation on Friday, with a vote of 106-28.

Tue
01
May

Maine and Vermont block legal adult-use cannabis sales yet again

Gov. Paul LePage vetoed Maine's cannabis regulations for a second time, while the Vermont House tabled a bill to create a taxed market for marijuana.

Fri
27
Apr

Vermont lawmakers push to expand marijuana legalization

A surprise twist in the Statehouse Thursday afternoon has the issue of marijuana legalization suddenly on the front burner in Montpelier again.

A tri-partisan coalition of House lawmakers is now pushing for legislation that would create an above-board market for commercial cannabis sales.

Earlier this year, lawmakers and Gov. Phil Scott passed a law that will, starting July 1, legalize possession of small amounts of marijuana and the cultivation of up to two mature cannabis plants. The law retains criminal penalties for large-scale cultivation and sales of the drug. 

Fri
27
Apr

Protection sought for medical marijuana users in Vermont who need an organ transplant

At the University of Vermont Medical Center, the only hospital in the state where kidney transplants are performed, potential recipients undergo a rigorous screening to get a shot at the life-changing operation. Among the factors that Dr. Carlos Marroquin, the chief of transplant surgery, considers is whether a patient uses marijuana, including medical cannabis.

"Because of the risks of infections, the unknown risk of cancer, because of the unknown effects on blood vessels, we try to select out for a healthy lifestyle, and so we strongly encourage patients against smoking marijuana," Marroquin said. "I think it's a risk."

Mon
05
Mar

Vermont considers a measure to regulate cannabis smell

When Vermont Governor Phil Scott (Rep.) signed House Bill 511 to legalize recreational cannabis on January 22,  he spoke very clearly about users’ right to privacy. “I personally believe that what adults do behind closed doors and on private property is their choice, so long as it does not negatively impact the health and safety of others, especially children,” Gov. Scott wrote in a press release after the signing.

But some law enforcement officials are calling for an officious crackdown on the odors wafting under the closed doors of people using or growing cannabis in their own homes. And now with the support of Republican lawmakers in the state, Vermont considers a measure to regulate cannabis smell.

Fri
23
Feb

How does Vermont's medical marijuana program spend its money?

Vermont Public Radio recently reported that the state transferred $300,000 from its medical marijuana program into the general fund to help shore up a $30 million budget gap.

That article doesn’t happen without dogged activism and oversight from Vermont residents, especially registered medical marijuana patients and caregivers who brought this information to the media.

Fri
23
Feb

Vermont panel looks at saliva test for drugged driving

A second House panel started taking testimony on Wednesday on a bill that would allow for saliva testing to detect the presence of drugs in motorists. Lawmakers heard talk of legal challenges and suggested changes to safeguard the legislation.

“I’m confident it will be hotly litigated,” Vermont Public Safety Commissioner Thomas Anderson, a former federal prosecutor and backer of the saliva testing legislation, told members of the House Judiciary Committee.

“With Vermont being on the cusp of legalizing marijuana, it’s an opportune time to be discussing collectively what we can do to improve roadway safety,” he said. “Driving is a privilege, it’s not a right, and the state can legislatively put conditions on that right.”

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Vermont