Uruguay

Wed
06
Jul

Marijuana Can Be Sold at Uruguay Pharmacies, but Few Want To

Rossana Rilla could sell marijuana under Uruguay’s pioneering law that lets pharmacies distribute pot. But she says there is no way she will.

In her 28 years as a pharmacist, she has been beaten, dragged across the floor and threatened by thieves at gunpoint and with a grenade. She fears that selling marijuana would only make her store a bigger target for robbers and burglars.

“You see their faces and you can tell right away that they are not consumers who are here just to buy” marijuana, Rilla said about the “suspicious people” who have recently been coming into her Montevideo pharmacy asking if she sells pot.

Tue
05
Jul

Just Like That Legal Marijuana Sold in Uruguay

Starting August, legal marijuana in Uruguay will be dispensed in "normal bags" of 10 grams without advertising and with information on its composition and its effects, said EFE Secretary General of the National Drug Board, Milton Romani.

Recreational cannabis bags will not be on public view in the pharmacies that are authorized for marketing and these can store a certain amount of marijuana a week, which has not yet been stipulated, Romani said.

The fact that the 'stock' is accounted for weekly matches that the users have a weekly purchase limit of 10 grams (40 per month).

While prices have not yet been set, it is expected to be marketed at $1.2 per gram with establishments acquiring it for $0.9.

Tue
28
Jun

Like Seriously! Marijuana Is Legal in These 7 Countries

New Delhi: One must have seen naga babas consuming marijuana. Consumption of Cannabis is legal in various states across the United States of America and some other European countries, but that of course comes with T&C applied.

Here, we bring you some countries where consumption of marijuana is legal:

Czech Republic:

Marijuana is legal in this European country that permits its possession up to 15 grams. It has been legalised for medical use on prescription since 2013.

Thu
16
Jun

Uruguay's First crop of legal marijuana: 300 grams of cannabis per plant

Licensees for distribution began planting and harvesting this week. The product will be delivered to pharmacies in packs of 5 and 10 grams

The two companies responsible for the production of legal marijuana in Uruguay are collecting about 300 grams per plant in the first harvest that began this week, reports the local publication Ecos.uy, working with government sources.

The president of the National Drug Board (JND), Juan Andrés Roballo, told reporters "soon will be the first harvest of the successful tenderers (ICCorp and Simbiosys)" which since February have been working in the fields of the Institute of Regulation and Control of Cannabis (IRCCA) for the production of the plant.

Wed
08
Jun

In Countries Where Weed Is Legal, This Is the Hellscape They've Become

The global conversation on marijuana legalization has reached its highest volume yet. Already, some countries, the United States included, have pioneered past decriminalization and into some form of legalization. Few have fully legalized marijuana — and have yet to transform into total hellscapes from it. 

Thu
02
Jun

Uruguay sharpens details to start selling marijuana in July in 50 pharmacies

However, sales of recreational cannabis in pharmacies is no consensus in the trade sector, such as the Association of Chemistry and Pharmacy of Uruguay (AQFU), which has communicated to its various partners "it is not the place to sell  this drug" in contrast to the provisions of the current law.

Today official sources reported that the Uruguayan government finalized the details to begin the sale of marijuana for recreational use in some 50 pharmacies across the country starting July, following the adoption in 2013 of a law that regulates the production and sale of the grass.

Mon
16
May

10 Countries (Aside From the U.S.) Where Some Form of Medical Marijuana Is Legal

Since 1996, two dozen states have approved medical marijuana laws in the U.S. The most recent was Pennsylvania, which passed medical marijuana legislation just last month. We've also witnessed four states legalize the sale of recreational marijuana.

For medical marijuana patients, approval of the drug at the state level means possible new pathways to treatment. Though each state typically differs on what diseases and disorders qualify, glaucoma, epilepsy, and most terminal cancers are ailments that commonly fit the bill. For the states themselves, legalization is primarily motivated by the additional revenue-generating potential. Since marijuana is taxed, medical marijuana provides a way for states to funnel extra money to schools or law enforcement.

Fri
06
May

Will Legalising Cannabis Extend Prohibition?

The inexorable momentum towards cannabis legalisation has taken hold across the globe. New, courageous policies are emerging in all corners of the earth – from Uruguay to Canada, from Ireland to Germany, a wave of positive reforms are being passed or pondered over by policymakers. 

Tue
26
Apr

Why Does The United Nations Find It So Hard To Talk About Drugs?

I have just watched the closing plenary session of the 2016 UN General Assembly Special Session on the world drug problem here in New York. Presidents and Prime Ministers will now move on to the climate change summit that opens tomorrow, and the thousands of government and NGO delegates who have filled the UN building in Manhattan over the last 3 days will catch their flights back to all corners of the globe. So was it worth it – three years of preparation, tens of millions of dollars of travel and meeting costs, and countless hours of debate and negotiation. Is the international community any better placed to reduce the health, social and economic problems associated with illicit drug markets?

Tue
19
Apr

Uruguay to Test World's First State-Commissioned Recreational Cannabis

For a Latin American narcotics kingpin, Guillermo Delmonte cuts a low key figure. The 29-year-old Uruguayan has never smoked cannabis in his life. He’s never smoked a cigarette either, and he barely drinks. When asked if he has any vices, he has to pause to think. “I’m addicted to orange juice. Perhaps,” he eventually says with a bemused laugh.

Sitting in his minimalist office overlooking Montevideo’s main square, and wearing an open-necked Ralph Lauren shirt and expensive blue jeans, he looks every bit the fitness-obsessed executive.

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