Uruguay

Fri
20
Apr

The 6 most advanced countries for marijuana research

The most advanced countries for marijuana research are using science to defeat the stigma while getting people the medicine they need.

It is commonly known that the U.S. is not apart of the most advanced countries for marijuana research. Due to its legal status, receiving funding for cannabis research has been proven quite difficult in the U.S. The government still holds restrictive policies and regulations on research that will look into the benefits and risks of cannabis, which is available to consumers in numerous states.

Tue
30
Jan

Cannabis Wheaton Income Corp. Announces Expansion to Uruguay and Securing of Significant CBD-Rich Hemp Production

Cannabis Wheaton Income Corp. (d/b/a Wheaton Income) (TSX-V:CBW) ("Wheaton Income" or "Wheaton" or the "Company") is pleased to announce that it has entered into a binding interim agreement (the “Agreement”) with Inverell S.A. (“Inverell”), pursuant to which Wheaton will purchase 80% of the issued and outstanding common shares on a fully diluted basis of Inverell.

Inverell is a federally licensed “Cannabis Operator” based in Montevideo, Uruguay and was founded by Dr. Raúl Urbina. Dr. Urbina completed his post-graduate studies in Molecular Biology at Princeton University and Agronics at the University of Almeria in Spain and possesses broad experience managing high-tech agricultural projects with a strong innovation component.

Mon
15
Jan

Crime rate drops but Uruguay struggles with illicit sale of Cannabis to tourists

“We passed the idea of avant-garde country, and the foreigner arrives here and cannot buy?” one Cannabis expert said.

As the summer months roll in and the tourists begin to arrive, Uruguay may see more than a few disgruntled backpackers as its 2017 legalization of marijuana still only applies to the nation’s residents.

Thu
11
Jan

Government supplied cannabis: Uruguay's controlled high

Uruguay has become the first country in the world where the cannabis market, its production and marketing are in the hands of the state.

It’s now legal to buy, sell and consume this drug in the country.

The small South American state is the first and only country in the world to have embraces legalisation so fully. So what are the results of this after 6 months?

To get aspirin or painkillers for his back pain, Federico has always gone to his local pharmacy. But since July 19, 2017, he has also come to buy his cannabis.

Tue
12
Dec

Uruguay regulates legal marijuana program with Integrated Biometrics fingerprint scanners

A controversial legal marijuana distribution program is underway in Uruguay, with Integrated Biometrics‘ fingerprint scanners enabling a range of government-imposed limitations, as well as allowing for user anonymity.

Planning for the program began in the South American nation of 3.4 million people in 2014, when former President José Mujica singed a bill to legalize recreational use of marijuana, in limited amounts, by Uruguayan citizens. The bill, which gives the government control of every aspect of the marijuana trade from production through distribution, was aimed at reducing crime associated with the drug trade, and other social benefits, but has been contentious both domestically and internationally.

Mon
11
Dec

Uruguay sells recreational marijuana to more than 16000 people five months after legalizing

Five months after legalising recreational marijuana, there are more than 16,000 Uruguayans registered to buy the drug from pharmacies, up from 5,000 users in July.

People in Uruguay can also grow plants at home, or become a member of a local Cannabis Club to withdraw up to 40g of marijuana per month. There are 70 membership clubs, according to data from the Institute for Regulation and Control of Cannabis website.

With many countries around the world campaigning to legalise the sale and purchase of marijuana, the world’s eyes are on countries like Uruguay to see how the government coped with the new system and what obstacles they encountered.

Mon
16
Oct

Uruguay to produce medical marijuana for export

International Cannabis Corporation will produce Uruguay’s first batch of medical cannabis oil for export in December, the company’s chief executive said Sunday.

The Montevideo-headquartered company plans to ship the oil to Canada and Mexico, but is also open to selling it on the domestic market, Alejandro Antalich added.

“The goal is to export it. But if the Public Health Minister thinks it can be commercialized in the local market the idea would be to do that,” Antalich told Reuters by phone.

Exporting cannabis oil would mark a new first for Uruguay, a small South American nation that in 2013 became the first country in the world to legalize marijuana from its cultivation to distribution.

Thu
14
Sep

Uruguay setting up new pot shops after challenge by banks

In this July 19, 2017 file photo, a pharmacist register a bag of legal marijuana as he sells it to a customer, at a pharmacy in Montevideo, Uruguay. The country is changing its marijuana selling system because banks were making it difficult for pharmacies to sell pot as had been planned. A government official said Wednesday Sept. 13 2017, that Uruguay will set up shops to sell pot for cash and avoid the problems faced by pharmacies.

Uruguay's government announced Wednesday that it is changing its retail system for legalized marijuana because banks are making it difficult for pharmacies to sell pot as planned.

Sat
26
Aug

US banking laws could hinder Uruguay's legal marijuana program

Uruguay's biggest bank is shuttering accounts linked to pharmacies that are legally selling marijuana due to concerns about running afoul of US laws regulating financial institutions, presenting a potentially significant obstacle to the advancement of Uruguay's historic marijuana legalization experiment.

Mon
21
Aug

Bank boycott snuffs Uruguay's legal marijuana sales

Uruguay's unique new marijuana industry has run into a hurdle as international anti-money laundering rules are forcing banks to close the accounts of pharmacies legally selling the drug.

Uruguayan pharmacies started selling marijuana last month under a 2013 law that made the South American country the first in the world to legalise pot all the way from production to sale.

But lenders such as Uruguayan state bank Banco Republica (BROU) now say they must abandon such businesses.

Not doing so would "cause BROU and its clients to be financially isolated", its president Jorge Polgar was quoted as saying by El Observador newspaper.

That would "prevent it from carrying out any kind of operation with an international counterpart", he warned.

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