South Dakota

Sat
03
Oct

South Dakota Native American Tribe Plans Marijuana-Themed Resort

he Flandreau Santee Sioux currently runs a successful casino, as well as a 120-room hotel and a 240-head buffalo ranch.

However, this business enterprise has been subject to the effects of both the Great Recession and stiff competition.

Now the small Indian tribe from South Dakota is opening the country's first marijuana resort, to be built on their reservation. This experiment could prove to be a money-making model for tribes who are looking to tap into economic opportunities apart from the casino industry.

The leaders of Santee Sioux intend to grow and sell their pot in the resort's facilities, including a nightclub, a game arcade, a bar and resto, slot machines and an outdoor music hall.

Sat
03
Oct

A 'deal with the devil'? Native American tribes push for marijuana legalization

Two Wisconsin tribes, the Menominee and the Ho-Chunk, look to follow South Dakota’s Flandreau Santee Sioux, seeing a potential revenue stream – but it could force them to cede some of their sovereignty to federal and local governments

With 23 US states having legalized marijuana in some form – Oregon became the latest to permit the sale of marijuana for recreational on Thursday – some Native American nations are now also considering the possibility of legalizing the plant, in some cases because it could represent a revenue stream.

Fri
02
Oct

Monarch America (BTFL) Emerges as the Leader In the Native American Marijuana Industry

On Thursday, December 11, 2014, the United States Department of Justice changed the landscape of the legal marijuana industry. They decided that Native American tribes across the country can grow and sell marijuana on their sovereign lands and must follow the federal guidelines in the four states where recreational marijuana is legal.

The United States is home to 326 federally recognized reservations and 566 federally recognized tribes, most of which are located in states that ban the use of marijuana for recreational purposes.

A leader emerges

Wed
30
Sep

South Dakota tribe to open America's first marijuana resort

FLANDREAU, S.D. — The small South Dakota Indian tribe known as the Flandreau Santee Sioux already has a successful casino, a 120-room hotel and a 240-head buffalo ranch.

Now it’s undertaking a new venture — opening the nation’s first marijuana resort on its reservation. The experiment could offer a new money-making model for tribes nationwide seeking economic opportunities beyond casinos.

Santee Sioux leaders plan to grow their own pot and sell it in a smoking lounge that includes a nightclub, arcade games, bar and food service, and eventually, slot machines and an outdoor music venue.

Tribal President Anthony Reider envisions the resort as “an adult playground.”

Mon
28
Sep

South Dakota: 13 voter initiatives seeking signatures

South Dakota voters could see a dozen or more voter-initiated measures on the 2016 ballot, touching on hot-button issues from marijuana and money lending to redistricting and right-to-work. First, backers need to collect enough signatures by Nov. 8, 2015, to make the cut. For most petitions that means 13,871, but constitutional amendments require 27,741.

Here's a rundown of petitions that are being circulated or pending approval by the Secretary of State's office:

Different alcohol containers are shown in shadow

Thu
24
Sep

South Dakota's Hard Push for Medical Marijuana in 2016

South Dakota isn’t exactly known for amazing drug policy. Actually it probably has some of the worst in the country. Just being in a room where marijuana is being used can get you a year in prison! Furthermore, I know and have heard of many people that have been absolutely screwed over by South Dakota’s draconic drug laws.

Fri
18
Sep

Is Cannabis Tourism a Cause for Concern?

As more and more places legalize and regulate cannabis, the wider implications of bringing the trade above ground have inevitably attracted scrutiny. A growth in tourism related to the drug is one such implication, and it's dividing opinion.

A Native American tribe in South Dakota, for example, has just announced its intention to legalize cannabis on tribal land (a right that the federal government has decided to grant to all Native American tribes), and its main motivation for doing so is to draw in cannabis consumers from all over the state, to generate extra revenue for those who live on the reservation.

Tue
08
Sep

Tribal lands set their own rules on pot

Most Native American tribes are opting not to legalize marijuana, though at least two are poised to try it — just six months after a Justice Department memo indicated federal authorities likely would not interfere with growing marijuana on tribal lands if other federal crimes were not committed.

Many tribes exploring their options said that as U.S. citizens and sovereign nations, they deserve the right to choose to legalize as states have done. However, tribes continue to balk at the vague language of the Justice Department's so-called "Cole Memorandum" and the fear of federal prosecution.

Tue
08
Sep

Why Native American Tribes Are Getting Into the Marijuana Business

Tribes are weighing the risks and opportunities of legalizing pot

This New Year’s Eve, Tony Reider wants to throw a party unlike any his South Dakota tribe has seen.

There will be live music, food, outdoor games—and, floating over the revelry, a haze of marijuana smoke, from a first-of-its-kind pot lounge that is set to open by the end of the year, said Reider, the tribal president of the Flandreau Santee Sioux in Flandreau, S.D.

That pot lounge—modeled on an Amsterdam coffee shop, where customers would be able to buy and smoke up to 2 grams of marijuana a day—would be illegal anywhere else in South Dakota, which, like most U.S. states, bans the sale, possession and public smoking of pot.

Tue
28
Jul

South Dakota law enforcement takes cautious approach to marijuana as medicine

South Dakotans have long been using marijuana illegally to treat a variety of aliments. A new initiated measure is aiming to legalize up to three ounces of marijuana for patients with serious medical conditions. The patient would need two separate doctor recommendations. 

Republican state Sen. Craig Tieszen isn't the stereotypical backer of medical marijuana in South Dakota.

For more than three decades, Tieszen wore a badge as a police officer, spending the last seven years of his career as Rapid City police chief.

And now he is a suit-wearing lawmaker, who is serving the final year of his fourth term in the South Dakota Senate.

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