South America

Thu
01
Feb

Canadian Cannabis companies set their sights on South America

Much has been made of the marijuana M&A spree afoot in Canada. Just this year alone, licensed producer Aurora Cannabis Inc. agreed to acquire CanniMed Therapeutics Inc for $852 million, which would create the largest cannabis company in the world.

Bank of Montreal got into the weed game with a $175 million deal with Canopy Growth Corp. Skyrocketing cannabis stocks are leading to comparisons to the dot-com boom, and American marijuana companies are looking North for more capital and a friendly business environment.

Amid the frenzy, Canadian cannabis companies are increasingly setting their sights on South America, where several countries are liberalizing their cannabis laws.

Wed
31
Jan

Which city in the world has the cheapest cannabis – and the most expensive?

A new survey of the cost of buying marijuana in 120 cities around the world suggests it is most expensive in Asia – but not necessarily cheaper in those cities where it is legal.

The highly variable cost of cannabis in cities around the globe indicates that prices do not necessarily come down with increased consumption – or even legality, according to a new survey.

The 2018 Cannabis Price Index, compiled by Seedo, an automatic cultivator device company based in Tel Aviv, claims to give the going rate for cannabis in 120 cities, ranging from £22.86 (US £32.66) per gram in Tokyo to less than £1 ($1.34) in Quito.

The five most expensive global cities to buy marijuana

Mon
29
Jan

South America grants licenses to grow medical marijuana

2017 will go down on history as one of the most progressive years for the global cannabis community. While there is still a long way to go, the legalisation wave, particularly in the medical field, has reached a large number of parliaments around the world.

And of course this also applies to South America, where many countries have pushed the legalisation debate onto their parliaments’ agenda, with Argentina, Chile, Puerto Rico, Colombia and Mexico having decriminalised the use of medical cannabis and Uruguay emerging as the only country to have legalised both medical and recreational uses.

Mon
15
Jan

Crime rate drops but Uruguay struggles with illicit sale of Cannabis to tourists

“We passed the idea of avant-garde country, and the foreigner arrives here and cannot buy?” one Cannabis expert said.

As the summer months roll in and the tourists begin to arrive, Uruguay may see more than a few disgruntled backpackers as its 2017 legalization of marijuana still only applies to the nation’s residents.

Fri
12
Jan

Colombia aims to become global export leader in medicinal marijuana in 2018

Colombia could supply 44% of the global demand for medicinal marijuana in 2018 after the board of directors of the country’s Drug Control Fund authorized the harvest of 40,5 tons of this plant for export-only proposes.

Thu
11
Jan

Government supplied cannabis: Uruguay's controlled high

Uruguay has become the first country in the world where the cannabis market, its production and marketing are in the hands of the state.

It’s now legal to buy, sell and consume this drug in the country.

The small South American state is the first and only country in the world to have embraces legalisation so fully. So what are the results of this after 6 months?

To get aspirin or painkillers for his back pain, Federico has always gone to his local pharmacy. But since July 19, 2017, he has also come to buy his cannabis.

Thu
21
Dec

Where Marijuana is and isn't legal

Take a look some countries that have either legalized, decriminalized or simply chosen to tolerate recreational marijuana.

United Kingdom

Having been reclassified in 2009 from a Class C to a Class B drug, cannabis is now the most used illegal drug within the United Kingdom. The UK is also, however, the only country where Sativex – a prescribed drug that helps to combat muscle spasms in multiple sclerosis and contains some ingredients that are also found in cannabis - is licensed as a treatment.

Tue
12
Dec

Uruguay regulates legal marijuana program with Integrated Biometrics fingerprint scanners

A controversial legal marijuana distribution program is underway in Uruguay, with Integrated Biometrics‘ fingerprint scanners enabling a range of government-imposed limitations, as well as allowing for user anonymity.

Planning for the program began in the South American nation of 3.4 million people in 2014, when former President José Mujica singed a bill to legalize recreational use of marijuana, in limited amounts, by Uruguayan citizens. The bill, which gives the government control of every aspect of the marijuana trade from production through distribution, was aimed at reducing crime associated with the drug trade, and other social benefits, but has been contentious both domestically and internationally.

Mon
11
Dec

Uruguay sells recreational marijuana to more than 16000 people five months after legalizing

Five months after legalising recreational marijuana, there are more than 16,000 Uruguayans registered to buy the drug from pharmacies, up from 5,000 users in July.

People in Uruguay can also grow plants at home, or become a member of a local Cannabis Club to withdraw up to 40g of marijuana per month. There are 70 membership clubs, according to data from the Institute for Regulation and Control of Cannabis website.

With many countries around the world campaigning to legalise the sale and purchase of marijuana, the world’s eyes are on countries like Uruguay to see how the government coped with the new system and what obstacles they encountered.

Wed
06
Dec

Paraguay Congress legalizes planting of medical marijuana

Paraguay’s Congress passed a bill on Tuesday creating a state-sponsored system to import marijuana seeds and grow the plant for medical uses, a decision that followed other countries in Latin America.

The landlocked South American nation had authorized the importing of cannabis oil in May, under control of the health ministry, and Tuesday’s decision was celebrated by patients their and loved ones for making it more readily available.

“We are very happy because this will also allow for the import of seeds for oil production,” said Roberto Cabanas, vice president Paraguay’s medicinal cannabis organization. His daughter has Dravet syndrome and the family was paying $300 a month for imported cannabis oil.

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