Oceania

Wed
18
Nov

Australia: Pharmacy sets sights on medical marijuana business

A TABLELANDS pharmacy is preparing to become one of the first medical marijuana ­dispensaries in Queensland should the drug be legalised in Australia.

Yungaburra Pharmacy co-owner Mark Hope has spent thousands of dollars on buying online domain names such as medicalweed.com.au and meed.com.au to start selling the herb should it be decriminalised for use by the terminally ill, chronic pain sufferers and those with drug-resistant epilepsy.

Queensland is partnering with New South Wales to start trials with the drug next year, with Federal Health Minister Sussan Ley suggesting a medical marijuana industry could flourish in Australia.

Mon
09
Nov

Western Australia parents treating children with medicinal marijuana illegally

Up to 100 West Australian parents are illegally using cannabis to treat children living with epilepsy, the chief executive of an epilepsy organisation says.

Epilepsy Association of WA (EAWA) chief executive Suresh Rajan said medicinal marijuana was being used extensively on WA children.

"I would have anything up to 80 to 100 mums that I know of in Western Australia who use it [on their children]. Illegally, I will emphasise, because it is not legal yet in Western Australia," he said.

Campaigners said there was evidence that cannabidiol, one of the compounds in marijuana, can stop seizures and boost the quality of life of those with epilepsy.

Tue
03
Nov

New Zealand Cannabis debate more urgent than nation's flag

You are being offered the wrong referendum. The matter to be decided should not be the design of a flag on which 6000 people have made submissions, but the status of a law which 400,000 people feel inclined to break each year.

The question of whether crime should be reduced, taxes collected and liberty increased on par with comparable risks, has been the subject of referendums in Oregon, Colorado, Washington and Alaska. It is likely California, Arizona, Maine and Massachusetts will also in the near future legalise the recreational use of marijuana.

The current position in New Zealand is that marijuana should be prohibited as the risks are too high to allow the public to have regularised access to it. The evidence shows that the risks are real.

Thu
29
Oct

Kiwibank returning money to medicinal cannabis charity

Thousands of dollars belonging to a charity advocating for medicinal cannabis has been returned after a bank stonewalled its moves to open an account.

United In Compassion (UIC) is a non-profit group advocating for New Zealand-based research into the therapeutic effects of cannabis-based medicines.

Kiwibank was the third bank that UIC, which has been trying to set up an account in the lead-up to a national symposium in April, has hit hurdles with.

On Wednesday afternoon Kiwibank agreed to release the money immediately but won't open an account for the group until compliance issues are sorted.

UIC co-founder Toni-Marie Matich approached Kiwibank for help in June and close to $5000 has been sitting in the account for the last month.

Wed
28
Oct

Censored UN paper calling for decriminalization marks beginning of the end of drug war as we knew it

A UN agency censored an official paper calling for drug use decriminalization. But its message is here to stay

Recently, the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime quietly circulated a remarkable document not only calling “decriminalising drug use and possession for personal consumption…consistent with international drug control conventions” but stating that doing so “may be required to meet obligations under international human rights law.”

Tue
27
Oct

Trials a step forward for medicinal cannabis in Australia - what's next?

Queenslanders and Victorians with particular chronic illnesses may now be eligible to join New South Wales medicinal cannabis trials, due to start mid next year.

The three states will collaborate on the development of medicinal cannabis, its regulatory framework and clinical research to explore the safety and benefits of the product among three key groups:

Tue
27
Oct

Highs and lows of pot in NZ

A recent visitor from California was astounded at the cloak and dagger nature of cannabis consumption in New Zealand.

Under California State law she, a retired health professional, can openly grow her own medicinal marijuana (strictly for personal use) in the garden along with her roses and courgettes, or buy it from licensed dispensers.

The law takes the drama out of the situation by giving patients with doctors' recommendations safe access without risking arrest. Qualifying conditions include anorexia, arthritis, cancer, HIV/AIDs, glaucoma, migraine, muscle spasms, severe nausea, seizures and any debilitating condition where the use of cannabis has been deemed appropriate.

Tue
27
Oct

Let's get logical on medical cannabis

I came have been advocating for the introduction of medicinal cannabis for about 4 years.

I am a solo mother of five children and my eldest daughter, 17, suffers from Dravet syndrome, a intractable, life-limiting and progressive form of epilepsy where she would seizure up to 1000 times a day.

My daughter has been on dozens of medications. She has undergone a vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) implant - one of the first in New Zealand - which was ineffective, high dosages of steroids, and other more alternative treatments such as sacral massage and naturopathic remedies.

Mon
26
Oct

Legalised medical marijuana opposed by only 7% of Australians, poll shows

The Roy Morgan poll found 91% of those surveyed said marijuana for medical purposes should be made legal, with strongest support in the 50-plus age group

Only 7% of Australians surveyed for their views on medical marijuana said they were opposed to the drug being made legal for medicinal purposes, a new survey shows.

In a poll released by Roy Morgan Research on Monday, 644 Australians aged 14 and above were asked: “In your opinion should the use of marijuana for medicinal purposes be made legal or remain illegal?”

Mon
26
Oct

91% of Australians support marijuana for medical purposes

MORE than nine out of every 10 Australians (91%) believe the use of marijuana for medicinal purposes should be made legal, according to a special Roy Morgan telephone survey.

Only 7% of respondants to the survey - conducted last week with 644 Australians aged 14+ - are against legalisation and 2% can't say.

This is the first time Roy Morgan Research has asked specifically about the medicinal use of marijuana.

The landslide result comes from widespread support for the legalisation of medicinal marijuana among men and women, different age groups, states of residence and federal voting intention.

Analysis by age and gender

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