New Mexico

Tue
21
Feb

Too High? How a New Mexico Cannabis Dispensary Is Dealing With Energy Use

One of New Mexico's top-grossing medical cannabis producers, The Verdes Foundation, implemented Wednesday a new system to help cut energy use at both of its locations.

Thu
16
Feb

New Mexico GOP calls out House Speaker for failing to disclose cannabis ties

The Republican Party of New Mexico criticized the Democratic leader of the state House of Representatives on Tuesday for not disclosing his work as an attorney for a licensed marijuana producer as the Legislature considers several cannabis-related bills.

State GOP spokesman Tucker Keene said House Speaker Brian Egolf of Santa Fe failed to mention on a state financial disclosure statement that he represented a marijuana producer in a lawsuit against the state.

Egolf says he complied with disclosure requirements by listing each state agency before which he has represented a client, and that he sees no conflict in acting on marijuana-related legislation that is not specific to his client.

Thu
16
Feb

Will insurers begin covering medical marijuana?

Medical marijuana has a long history of being denied coverage by insurance companies. Up to now most insurance companies refuse to cover cannabinoid treatments, typically citing federal regulations as the main reason to decline medical marijuana coverage. This is especially true in the United States where cannabis is a Schedule I controlled substance under the Controlled Substances Act with “no perceived medicinal value”.

In New Mexico, an employee hurt on the job was denied medical marijuana coverage under his worker’s compensation insurance and his suit to force the coverage failed. Beside the ruling in New Mexico, lower courts in Michigan, Maine, Massachusetts, and Connecticut have given similar verdicts to workplace insurers.

Thu
09
Feb

New Mexico may allow medical marijuana for all veterans

Extensive revisions to New Mexico's medical marijuana program that would automatically allow all military veterans to qualify as patients are advancing in the state Legislature.

The Senate Judiciary Committee endorsed the proposed legislation on Wednesday despite objections from members to the veterans' eligibility provisions. The bill's next stop is the full Senate.

Other proposed changes to a 2007 law legalizing medical cannabis would add treatable medical conditions including substance abuse disorder. State registry cards for approved patients would require renewal every three years instead of annually.

Senate bill sponsor Cisco McSorley of Albuquerque says the provision for veterans addresses the stigma associated with post-traumatic stress disorder.

Mon
06
Feb

Bill to Legalize, Tax, and Regulate Marijuana Passes New Mexico House Committee

A bill to legalize, tax, and safely regulate marijuana passed the House Consumer and Public Affairs Committee by a vote of 3 to 1. House Bill 89 would open New Mexico to the $35 billion marijuana industry and create a major new stream of revenue for our ailing economy. The revenue from this act would fund our public schools, substance abuse programs, public safety, and the public defenders office. The act would legalize the social use of marijuana for adults aged 21 or over.

Thu
26
Jan

New Mexico Legislature considers legalizing marijuana

Democratic state lawmakers say the time is ripe for New Mexico to legalize and tax marijuana sales for recreational use as the state grapples with a budget deficit and plunging revenues.

Democratic Sen. Gerald Ortiz y Pino of Albuquerque on Wednesday announced details of a forthcoming bill to legalize marijuana and tax sales by at least 15 percent to help shore up shaky state finances and reinvigorate the economy.

Local governments would choose whether to allow marijuana sales and could collect a 5 percent tax. Former district attorney and Republican New Mexico Gov. Susana Martinez has consistently opposed legalizing marijuana or industrial hemp production.

Fri
13
Jan

Marijuana reforms flood state legislatures

Legislators in more than a dozen states have introduced measures to loosen laws restricting access to or criminalizing marijuana, a rush of legislative activity that supporters hope reflects a newfound willingness by public officials to embrace a trend toward legalization.

The gamut covered by measures introduced in the early days of legislative sessions underscores the patchwork approach to marijuana by states across the country — and the possibility that the different ways states treat marijuana could come to a head at the federal Justice Department, where President-elect Donald Trump’s nominee to become attorney general is a staunch opponent of legal pot.

Wed
14
Dec

How the Medical Cannabis Program Helps My PTSD

Growing up in Ohio, I experienced a series of very traumatic events as a child which have impacted me throughout my life. And again, as a young adult living in South Carolina, working as a EMT and doing beach patrol. I realize now that I attempted to handle my PTSD symptoms in many ways, some healthy and some unhealthy, but still suffered through many bad decisions, lost jobs, more bad experiences, and failed relationships because of my C-PTSD symptoms.

Tue
06
Dec

United States of Marijuana: These Might Be the Next 5 States to Legalize Weed

Somebody's got to be the first state to free the weed through the legislature.

Four states, including California, the nation’s most populous, voted to legalize marijuana on November 8. That doubles the number of legal states to eight, and more than quadruples the number of people living in legal marijuana states, bringing the number to something around 64 million.

Every one of those states legalized marijuana through the initiative process, but we’re not going to see anymore initiatives on state ballots until 2018, and perhaps 2020. That means that if we are to make more progress on spreading marijuana legalization in the next couple of years, it’s going to have to come at the state house instead of the ballot box.

Wed
23
Nov

Pot Farming Becoming a Big Business

Duke Rodriguez brought a three-week-old pot plant to the State Fair, touching off a silly kerfuffle that highlights the absurdity of our current marijuana laws.

Rodriguez is president and CEO of Ultra Health LLC, based in Scottsdale, Ariz. The plant he displayed to fairgoers is just one of 450 Ultra Health is permitted to grow on its 11-acre pot ranch in Bernalillo.

For publicly exhibiting a marijuana plant, the state demands Ultra Health suspend sales for five days, a penalty Rodriguez says will cost him $100,000.

There’s serious money in the legal marijuana trade, and a lot more still on the horizon.

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