Maine

Fri
04
Aug

Proposal Would Limit Mainers to 12 Personal Marijuana Plants

Maine legislators have introduced a new proposal limiting the amount of marijuana plants citizens grow on their land for personal use.

The Portland Press Herald reports the plan limits the amount of mature plants to 12. The plants also must be tagged with a name and a Maine driver’s license number.

Supporters of the proposal say it would limit large unlicensed marijuana crops that have led to violence in other states. Opponents say it limits the amount of personal plants currently allowed by law and it blocks farmers from renting their land to others interested in growing their own.

Republican Sen. Roger Katz, co-chairman of the Legislature’s marijuana legalization committee, says they are trying to "find the middle ground."

Mon
31
Jul

States forge path through uncharted territory to legal pot

Legal weed has unleashed an entrepreneurial spirit across the USA and holds the potential to reshape communities, but voter-approved relaxation of drug laws may bring consequences we don't yet understand as we soften the war on drugs.

A USA TODAY Network investigation into marijuana legalization reveals increases in marijuana-related car crashes and in hospitalization of kids who steal their parents' pot, of black-market smuggling rings and the challenges of running cash-based businesses that can’t use traditional banks because of federal regulations.

Mon
31
Jul

In Maine, the marijuana comes to you

PORTLAND, Maine — Logan Martyn-Fisher checks his phone's GPS one more time and pulls up at the Portland Amtrak station, thousands of dollars of marijuana concealed in a pair of colorful beach totes sitting on the back seat of his BMW SUV.

He’s looking for a guy who’s looking for pot.

Maine doesn’t yet allow legal marijuana sales, so Martyn-Fisher, his girlfriend and their BMW have carved a niche for themselves in a state where possessing, growing and consuming cannabis now is permitted. This past fall, Maine voters legalized marijuana as of the start of this year, but lawmakers still are developing a system of state-regulated stores to sell it.

They hope to have the stores open by February 2018.

Wed
26
Jul

Maine Department of Labor Advises Employers to Stop Testing Employees for Cannabis

The Maine Department of Labor has advised most employers in the state not to test job applicants for marijuana use. It is currently illegal for employers to reject applicants who test positive for cannabis, because they may be legally using marijuana for medical reasons. Now that recreational use is legal in the state, employers can no longer fire an employee who tests positive for marijuana use, and must instead prove that they were impaired while at work.

Mon
24
Jul

What Maine's new recreational marijuana market will look like

Maine lawmakers are coalescing around a rough plan for the state’s new recreational marijuana industry after months of wonky hearings and with weeks more to go before a final proposal that could come by summer’s end.

Voters backed legalization by a slim margin in the 2016 election, approving a law allowing Mainers over age 21 to possess 2.5 ounces of marijuana. It said marijuana would be taxed at 10 percent and built on a statewide cultivation cap of 800,000 square feet.

Mon
24
Jul

Marijuana shop promises free weed to cleanup the city of Gardiner

Some are calling his methods controversial, but Dennis Meehan says the community is reaping high rewards. Literally.

Meehan discussed the success of a recent social media campaign in which he promised free cannabis to anyone 21 and over who donated their time to a community cleanup project over the weekend.

Meehan and his wife are caregivers and owners of the Summit Medical Marijuana shop in Gardiner.

On Monday, he posted on the company's Facebook page promising up to 2 grams of free cannabis for filling up trash bags with garbage collected around the city Saturday.

He says by Friday the post had been shared hundreds of times and had tens of thousands of views.

Fri
21
Jul

Maine: House passes bill to require agriculture department to test marijuana for safety

The Maine House overwhelmingly approved a bill Thursday that would require the state’s Department of Agriculture to set up testing facilities so it could test marijuana for safety before it is sold for recreational use.

The bill faces further votes in both the House and Senate, and will likely face the scrutiny of Republican Gov. Paul LePage, who has urged lawmakers to put the regulation of marijuana wholly in the hands of the state’s Bureau of Alcoholic Beverages and Lottery Operations, which oversees the state’s wholesale liquor business and its lottery games.

Tue
06
Jun

Baby Boomers Taking up Pot Again May Be Surprised How Much It's Changed

With both medical and recreational marijuana use now legal in Maine, today’s growers are combining green thumbs with advanced chemistry to produce varieties to treat everything from anxiety to pain.

But things have changed a bit since the days when marijuana was an illicit drug sold on the black market — including the potency of today’s marijuana.

“Back when I was a teenager I’d smoke a little bit on and off,” the 67-year-old said. “I joined the Air Force in 1969 and did not smoke much after that for many years until I got my medical marijuana card six years ago.”

Fri
26
May

Maine: Lawmakers give initial approval to marijuana regulatory bill

The Legislature has given preliminary approval and may soon send to Gov. Paul LePage a bill that funds and designates the agency that will administer recreational marijuana sales in Maine, approved by voters at referendum in November.

The bill gives the Bureau of Alcoholic Beverages and Lottery Operations the authority to oversee recreational marijuana use. That’s a change from the measure approved by voters, which would have given regulatory authority to the Department of Agriculture, Conservation and Forestry.

Mon
15
May

Maine: City and town leaders grapple with how to regulate recreational marijuana

Across Maine, the knowledge that the sale of recreational marijuana will eventually be legal has many towns and cities bracing for the change.

It’s a daunting task for the local officials who are considering the potential effects of legalization, from the odors that could waft off of growing facilities, to the burden those facilities could place on water and electric systems, to the impaired drivers that could hit the road.

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