Maine

Wed
27
Sep

Maine could legalize drive-through and online weed sales

Ever wanted to buy weed on the World Wide Web? Well, if you live in Maine you might be able to in the near future.

new bill under consideration in the state legislature would allow for the creation of drive-through marijuana dispensaries in the state, and would also give consumers the option to buy cannabis online.

In the case of the drive-through option, customers would pull up to a window and buy their ganja on the go—Maine liquor stores already offer this service. Online purchases would be delivered directly to a customer’s home.

Wed
27
Sep

Maine: Hearing on recreational marijuana bill draws crowd to Augusta

There was no shortage of comments as scores of Mainers filled a hearing room and two overflow rooms at the State House to express their concerns with proposed legislation to regulate the recreational sale of marijuana in Maine. And those testifying were not shy about spelling out what they don’t like about the bill.

Members of the special committee set up to draft legislation were told the draft bill needs plenty of changes, and some, like Joanne Reese of Bryant Pond, think the committee has strayed too far from the measure that voters approved last fall by just under 4,000 votes.

Tue
26
Sep

New legislation would prohibit smoking weed in Maine cannabis clubs

A new bill to regulate recreational cannabis use in Maine would allow cannabis social clubs to open across the state beginning in 2019. However, the proposed bill does not include an exemption from the state's public smoking ban, so it will likely be illegal to smoke marijuana in these marijuana clubs. The smoking ban extends to vaping as well, so the current legislation would only permit use of edibles, tinctures, or topical cannabis products in these new venues.

Mon
25
Sep

A marijuana drive-through could be coming to a corner near you

‘Voters in Maine narrowly approved marijuana legalization last November, and since then, the state legislature has been busily trying to come up with rules and regulations for the legal weed market. Now, they are envisioning something of a rarity: allowing customers to buy their weed at drive-up windows.

Mon
18
Sep

Conflicting advice presented to marijuana rulemakers

When Maine solicited advice on how to set up its new recreational cannabis market, about a dozen groups from all over the country, from national marijuana consulting firms to the manager of a small Maine town, chimed in: Ban marijuana social clubs, despite the voters’ will. Discourage “drug warrior” cops. Tax marijuana enough to discourage youth use, but keep it competitive with street prices

Thu
14
Sep

Insurer says it shouldn't have to pay for medical marijuana

The Maine supreme court on Wednesday began considering whether a paper millworker left suicidal by narcotic painkillers should receive workers' compensation for medical marijuana.

It's the first time the court has considered the question of insurance reimbursement for medical marijuana.

Madawaska resident Gaetan Bourgoin won a ruling from the state's Workers' Compensation Board two years ago saying the paper mill's insurer must reimburse him for medical marijuana. He contends marijuana is cheaper and safer than narcotics.

But Twin Rivers Paper Co. and its insurer appealed the ruling, arguing that paying for pot use, even for medical purposes, could expose the companies to prosecution since marijuana still is illegal at the federal level.

Wed
13
Sep

Lawmakers want to double sales tax for recreational marijuana

Maine lawmakers want to double the recreational marijuana sales tax to 20 percent.

The Legislature's marijuana legalization committee will consider the issue at a Sept. 26 public hearing. Lawmakers say they'll likely postpone legalization of recreational marijuana sales past February.

The committee had supported adding a 10 percent excise tax on business owners who sell marijuana on top of the 10 percent sales tax. A draft marijuana bill released Tuesday calls for a 20 percent sales tax.

Committee co-chair Democratic Rep. Teresa Pierce said the tweak was due to the committee's lack of taxing expertise. She said an excise tax could allow more predictability.

Tue
12
Sep

Maine high court to decide if medical marijuana covered by workers' comp

The Maine Supreme Judicial Court will decide if state law requires Workers’ Compensation Insurance to pay for a millworker’s medical marijuana or if the insurer could be charged as an accessory in a drug deal under federal law.

Justices are set to hear arguments in the case Wednesday at the Capital Judicial Center in Augusta, which will be the first time the state’s highest court has considered the question of insurance reimbursement for the cost of medical marijuana.

The case pits a former Madawaska mill employee, injured on the job, against the company that administers the mill’s insurance for injured workers.

Tue
29
Aug

Head of US Border Patrol in Maine warns that marijuana legalization won't halt seizures

he top U.S. Border Patrol agent in Maine cautioned residents Monday that officers will still confiscate marijuana when they encounter it and that even family connections to the cannabis industry can disqualify someone from federal employment.

Chief Daniel Hiebert, who heads the Houlton sector of the Border Patrol, said Maine voters’ legalization of recreational marijuana last November and the state’s well-established medical marijuana program do not change his agents’ obligation to follow federal law.

Tue
08
Aug

Maine Committee Recommends Against Adding Marijuana Blood-Level Limit to OUI Laws

A committee convened by the Maine Department of Public Safety says it doesn’t believe that Maine needs to set a limit for determining whether a motorist is impaired by marijuana. The recommendation is likely to stir debate among law enforcement officials and legislators as implementation of the voter-approved recreational marijuana law plods forward.

Committee chair Scot Maddox said the state need not alter its operating under the influence law or create new blood-level limits for THC, the psychoactive component in marijuana. Instead, he said lawmakers should provide additional funding to train police officers, prosecutors and even judges to recognize marijuana impairment and its dangers while driving. He said there should also be a robust public education campaign.

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