Kansas

Wed
27
May

LA Pot Reform Bills Advance, KS Pot Reform Bill Dies, NE CBD Bill Dies

Louisiana may be about to reform its harsh marijuana laws, but not Kansas; a Nebraska CBD cannabis oil bill dies, a Michigan legalization initiative goes back to the drawing board, the Germans and the Israelis grapple with marijuana policy, and more.

Marijuana Policy

Fri
15
May

Kansas Movement on marijuana

Because of Wichita’s approval of a city ordinance in April and House action last week, Kansas no longer seems like the last place you’d expect to weaken marijuana laws.

The Kansas Supreme Court’s order Wednesday in response to Attorney General Derek Schmidt’s challenge of Wichita’s new marijuana ordinance was welcome news. The September oral arguments and resulting ruling should clarify the future of the ordinance, which is caught up in legal confusion.

Mon
11
May

Kansas' broad marijuana bill attracts bulk of GOP votes

Supporters of a broad bill that would ease marijuana laws wending its way through the Kansas Legislature claim it's a narrow enough set of reforms that conservative Republicans can vote for and demonstrates a shift in the long-running discussion.

Kansas' GOP-dominated House passed the bill by a wide margin Thursday, making it the most serious push to liberalize Kansas' marijuana policies in decades. The bill would decrease penalties for marijuana possession, order a state study of industrial hemp and allow limited production and sale of hemp oil to treat seizures.

Democratic Rep. Gail Finney from Wichita, who for many years has supported comprehensive marijuana legislation, said efforts to "educate" the Legislature have "paid off."

Fri
08
May

Kansas House passes bill on marijuana penalties, medical use

The Kansas House passed a bill Thursday that would decrease penalties for marijuana possession, allow the limited production and sale of hemp oil and study uses for industrial hemp.

The House also passed a compromise on green energy policy, and lawmakers considered new tax proposals as they seek ways to fill a budget gap of about $422 million before the close of the session.

The chamber's 81-36 vote Thursday sends the marijuana bill to the Senate for consideration. First- and second-time marijuana offenders without serious prior convictions would avoid jail time under the measure. That would decrease the population in the state's overcrowded prisons and save more than $1.7 million over the next two fiscal years, according to state estimates.

Tue
28
Apr

Kansas medical marijuana activist fights to be with son as officials feud over law

Although she has not been charged with a crime or arrested over the medicinal marijuana that was found in her home, a libertarian-leaning Kansas activist is at odds with her state over the custody and future of her 11-year-old son.

Wed
22
Apr

Kansas mom loses custody of son, 11, after he gives marijuana speech

WICHITA, Kansas -- A medical marijuana advocate has lost custody of her 11-year-old son at least temporarily and could face possible charges following comments the boy made during a drug education program at school.

The case of Shona Banda, 37, was forwarded Monday to the district attorney's office for a decision about charges, Police Capt. Randy Ralston said. Possible charges include possession of marijuana with intent to distribute, possession of drug paraphernalia and child endangerment, the department said in a news release.

No arrests have been made.

The divorced mother said she did not get custody of her son back following a hearing Monday, after Kansas authorities had placed the boy into protective custody.

Mon
20
Apr

A new shopper's high for 420: Marijuana-themed products are smoking hot

Marijuana is not just for getting baked anymore. As it becomes legal in more states, the wacky tobacky also is leaving its leafy green mark on American marketing.

From backpacks and bed sheets to toilet seats and thong underwear, cannabis culture is inspiring pot-themed products faster than Wiz Khalifa can burn through a dime bag.

And in advance of 420 — a kind of Stoner’s New Year celebrated on April 20 — plenty of people have been shopping for legal ganja goods, even where the drug is still vilified and against the law.

On a recent day, Kerry Baker (yes, that’s her real name) browsed the marijuana-themed products at Spencer’s Gifts in Oak Park Mall.

Mon
20
Apr

Kansas Police Shutdown Cannabis Oil Activist's Facebook to Prevent Her From Raising Money for her Legal Defense

The Garden City Police Department had cannabis oil activist Shona Banda’s Facebook account shutdown because she was using her social media network to raise money for her legal defense after the police raided her home and took her 11 year-old son into custody, all because he vocally disagreed with anti-cannabis propaganda that his school counselors were teaching in his classroom.

The GoFundMe account Shona is using to raise money was actually set up at her request, by Wichita activist Jennifer Winn and Kansas Exposed editor Mike Shatz.

Click here to donate to Shona’s legal defense:

Ben Swann has the original story:

Sun
19
Apr

State seizes 11-year-old, arrests his mother after he defends medical marijuana during a school presentation

From the website run by investigative journalist Ben Swann:

On March 24, cannabis oil activist Shona Banda‘s life was flipped upside-down after her son was taken from her by the State of Kansas. The ordeal started when police and counselors at her 11-year-old son’s school conducted a drug education class. Her son, who had previously lived in Colorado for a period of time, disagreed with some of the anti-pot points that were being made by school officials. “My son says different things like my ‘Mom calls it cannabis and not marijuana.’ He let them know how educated he was on the facts,” said Banda in an exclusive interview with BenSwann.com. Banda successfully treated her own Crohn’s disease with cannabis oil.

Wed
15
Apr

To the Bitter End: The 9 States Where Marijuana Will Be Legalized Last

We know the end is coming, but pot prohibition is going to have to be undone state by state. Here are the ones least likely to jump on the bandwagon.

Marijuana prohibition in the US is dying, but it isn't going to vanish in one fell swoop. Even if Congress were to repeal federal pot prohibition, state laws criminalizing the plant and its users would still be in effect—at least in some states.

And it's probably a pretty safe bet that Congress isn’t going to act until a good number of states, maybe more than half, have already legalized it. That process is already underway and is likely to gather real momentum by the time election day 2016 is over.

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