France

Mon
11
Dec

Drunk driving 11 times more dangerous than driving high

Several studies in recent years suggest an increase in car accidents following cannabis legalization, but the data typically lacks enough detail to provide a proper analysis. For example, the primary studies do not account for other substances, who was at fault or when the driver smoked cannabis.

The latter is key since a person can test positive for cannabis several weeks after consumption. Nevertheless, a new study reconfirms what many others have, namely that driving drunk is significantly more dangerous. 

"Cannabis, alcohol and fatal road accidents," published by the PLoS One journal in November 2017, examined details from the Metropolitan France police force that included more than 4,000 drivers involved in car accidents.

Mon
14
Aug

Marijuana Products Sending More French Kids to ERs

Increased availability of potent marijuana products in France may be driving an increase in emergency room visits by intoxicated toddlers, a new study suggests.

Yearly admissions for accidental marijuana intoxication at pediatric emergency departments in France more than doubled between 2004 and 2014, researchers found.

"I was surprised by the increase of admissions in my unit for cannabis unintentional intoxication among toddlers and by the increase of severe presentation after children had eaten part or a entire cannabis resin stick," said lead author Dr. Isabelle Claudet, who heads the pediatric emergency department at Hopital des Enfants in Toulouse.

Wed
02
Aug

Why Will Europe Be Slow in Legalising Medical Cannabis

Drug policy usually moves like an iceberg: slowly. And while and it can be hard to turn, sometimes it changes course in an unexpected direction. In the case of cannabis or marijuana, it may be picking up speed, but there are rough waters ahead.

Wed
05
Jul

Global Cannabis Lifestyle Brand Marley Natural Makes European Debut at Iconic French Retailer Colette

System Magazine and Creatures of the Wind collaborate with Marley Natural on pop-up during couture fashion week in Paris.

Fri
02
Jun

France To Effectively Decriminalize Cannabis By Ending Prison Terms

The French government is about to make some drastic changes to the enforcement of cannabis use laws. A government spokesperson revealed that by the end of 2017, France will end all prison terms for cannabis users.

Existing Policy

Current French law states that cannabis use is a criminal offense. It is punishable by up to one year in prison and up to a EUR 3,750 fine. Regardless, officials plan to end prison terms for cannabis users, even though cannabis use will remain a criminal offense until further legislative changes take place.

Tue
30
May

France Wants to Scrap Prison Terms for Cannabis Use

France will introduce a new law by the end of the year to soften punishments for cannabis use, officials say.

The legislation, a key promise of President Emmanuel Macron’s election campaign, will end prison terms for marijuana consumers.

But the changes will stop short of decriminalising use of the drug, according to government spokesman Christophe Castaner.

France is one of half-a-dozen countries in the EU that still criminalises cannabis use, in contrast to Portugal.

Mon
29
May

Oui: France to decriminalize Marijuana

France intends to soon stop prosecuting marijuana possession with years of imprisonment, according to a statement by GĂ©rard Collomb, the newly appointed interior minister.

Under new rules that are currently being developed, cannabis possession will be degraded from the highest status of crime to the lowest one, called "contravention" in the French judiciary system. As such, violators will no longer be subject to imprisonment; instead, people found in possession of marijuana will simply have to pay a fine of €100 ($111).

Thu
04
May

The French Presidential Election Offers A Clear Choice On Drug Policy

France’s national motto, dating back to the French Revolution, is “Liberté, Égalité, Fraternité.” How the two finalists for the French presidency embody those principles depends on how you define them.

Liberty can mean freedom from tyranny, but tyranny can take many forms: an overreaching government, poverty, or, in a sense, addiction to harmful and illegal drugs. Equality can mean everyone is treated the same under the law, or that potentially harmful vices are punished equally. Fraternity can mean solidarity among people with common interests, or it can mean people helping each other in ways such as helping drug addicts find drug rehabs instead of putting them in prison.

Mon
01
May

March for the decriminalization of cannabis in Paris

In rap and reggae tunes, the procession, composed of many young people but also of sick people, militant for the use of cannabis for therapeutic purposes, departed shortly after 15 hours from Place de la Bastille to Place de la Bastille. Republic, behind a banner proclaiming: “Worldwide marijuana cannabis decriminalization self-production cannabis therapeutic. Another drug policy is possible “. This year, the march was advanced to stand between the two rounds of the presidential.

Fri
07
Apr

French election: Four out of five presidential candidates support relaxation of cannabis laws

Four out of the five main candidates in the French presidential election support a relaxation of the country’s cannabis laws.

Under the current law, first passed in 1970, taking any illegal drug carries the risk of a one-year prison sentence and a fine of up to 3,750 euros.

However cannabis remains one of the most popular illegal drugs in France, with 47 per cent of 17-year-olds saying they have tried it, according to a recent survey by the French Observatory for Drugs and Addiction.

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