Colorado

Synonyms: 
Denver
Mon
29
Oct

Sal Pace is just fine with being Pueblo county's 'cannabis' commissioner

Most Colorado politicians have come around on legal cannabis since the state’s voters approved Amendment 64 in 2012, but much of their support started after the pot industry became a major financial player in the Colorado economy. Some Colorado officials were pushing for the plant long before it became sexy, though, and few have as many notches on their belt as Sal Pace.

Mon
29
Oct

Lawsuit in Colorado over marijuana, property values could have broad impacts

A federal trial in Colorado could have far-reaching effects on the United States’ budding marijuana industry if a jury sides with a couple who say having a cannabis business as a neighbor hurts their property’s value.

The trial set to begin Monday in Denver is the first time a jury will consider a lawsuit using federal anti-racketeering law to target cannabis companies. But the marijuana industry has closely watched the case since 2015, when attorneys with a Washington, D.C.-based firm first filed their sweeping complaint on behalf of Hope and Michael Reilly. One of the couple’s lawyers, Brian Barnes, said the Reillys bought the southern Colorado land for its views of Pikes Peak and have since built a house on the rural property. They also hike and ride horses there.

Fri
26
Oct

This is how legal marijuana changed Colorado and could change Michigan

If you think Colorado has become the wild west for weed, don’t tell the people who live there.

Six years since Colorado became the first state to legalize recreational marijuana, we traveled there to find out what’s changed. Most of the people we talked to said: not much.

“It’s very well controlled,” one Denver resident told us. “I think most people will be surprised at who goes in and purchases recreational marijuana. A lot of people in my (older) generation.”

Perhaps the best news of all, say marijuana proponents, is that there are fewer people going to jail or prison for low-level drug crimes. The number of marijuana-related arrests have plummeted since legalization.

Thu
25
Oct

Four Colorado weed industry rules that are about to change

Colorado’s cannabis industry is still changing at a rapid pace. The industry’s watchdog, the state Marijuana Enforcement Division, updates its rules and regulations every year in hopes of catching up with the expanding field, which is growing like a weed in more ways than one.

Mon
22
Oct

Researchers unlocking the mysteries of marijuana in Colorado, Michigan

The caterpillars are talking, and researchers at Colorado State University in Pueblo are listening as they explore the mysteries of cannabis. Questions are plentiful. Federal law hasn’t allowed much scientific research into this ancient plant, once widely shunned in the U.S. and now increasingly accepted.

Just what, exactly, makes cannabis tick? Its genetic code isn’t fully understood. A well-known, non-psychoactive chemical compound in cannabis called CBD has been shown to help relieve some seizures — there’s a federally approved CBD drug now — but what else can CBD or other cannabis compounds do?

Mon
22
Oct

Where does all the marijuana money go? Colorado's cannabis taxes, explained

Ever since Colorado legalized recreational cannabis there’s one perennial question that everyone always asks. Where is all the tax revenue from marijuana sales going? Depending on where you live, the questions may get a bit more specific: If schools get pot money why do they continue to hurt for cash? Are school buildings getting fixed? Why is my town or county seeking tax hikes, aren’t government budgets pot plush? What do we get for our tax money? Where is it ending up? In short, there’s a lot of questions.

Despite the fervor, marijuana isn’t the big green budget bandage that many envisioned. That’s not to say that the state isn’t making money on the deal, but, like many taxes, it’s not a cure-all that balances the checkbook.

Fri
19
Oct

Colorado: Leading seed-to-sale cannabis traceability firm BioTrackTHC to present traceability implementation case study

Patrick Vo, the President and CEO of BioTrackTHC, a wholly-owned subsidiary of Helix TCS Inc. (OTCQB: HLIX), will present a traceability implementation case study at the fourth annual Denver Marijuana Management Symposium, a two-day conference that offers solutions and best practices for government regulators navigating the emerging medical and recreational cannabis industries.

Fri
19
Oct

Amendment X in the 2018 Colorado election: What to know about the definition of industrial hemp

Amendment X asks whether to remove the definition of “industrial hemp” from the constitution. Here’s the language you’ll see on your ballot:

Shall there be an amendment to the Colorado constitution concerning changing the industrial hemp definition from a constitutional definition to a statutory definition?

What does that mean?

When Coloradans legalized marijuana, a definition for industrialized hemp was added to the constitution. Hemp can be used for building materials, food, fuel, medicine, paper, rope, and textiles, and has only the tiniest bit of THC, the psychoactive ingredient in marijuana.

Fri
19
Oct

Colorado marijuana sales exceeded $1B through August

A Colorado reports shows marijuana sales in the state have exceeded $1 billion as of August of this year, with tax revenue from those sales reaching $200 million.

The Denver Post reports the state Department of Revenue report indicates medical and recreational marijuana sales are on track to break last year's record of more than $1.5 billion.

This year's combined sales reached the billion-dollar mark at the earliest point in the four years recreational marijuana has been legal in the state. Total Sales through August 2017 reached more than $996 million.

According to the Marijuana Enforcement Division's 2018 Mid-Year Update, the industry's hot spots are in Denver, Boulder, El Paso and Pueblo counties, growing 80 percent of all plants in the state as of June.

Mon
15
Oct

Colorado sprinkles its tourism market with cannabis. Is there a lesson for Michigan?

It’s late afternoon on board the Buds & Beers party bus, where black shades cover the windows, neon lights spiral and pot smoke swirls. Taylor Butterfield, 24, of Arlington, Texas, spies the time.

“It’s four-twenty, boys!” Butterfield crows as he tears into a bag holding the pot he just bought at The Green Solutions retail shop. “Four-twenty” is code in pot culture for a time of day or a day — April 20 — to use weed.

Butterfield’s ready to pack a pipe in honor of the hour, but really the guys have been puffing ever since they got on the bus about 2 p.m. The bus is filled with nearly 20 twenty-somethings come to party from Texas and Louisiana, even a guy from Brazil by way of North Dakota. Some of them are part of a bachelor’s party.

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