Colorado

Synonyms: 
Denver
Mon
18
Jun

Collateral Impact: Cannabis industry a growing political force beneath the Gold Dome in Denver

The marijuana industry in Colorado has grown quickly into a potent lobbying force at the Capitol.

Marijuana businesses, law firms, consultants and trade organizations spent at least $720,000 on lobbyists during the 2018 legislative session that ran through May 9, according to an analysis by The Gazette.

That was more than oil and gas ($530,000). It was more than grocery and liquor interests combined ($560,000).

The sheer number of marijuana-related bills partly accounts for the big spending. Legislators and lobbyists tackled more than 30 affecting the marijuana and hemp industries.

Fri
15
Jun

Denver using marijuana taxes for after-school and summer youth programs

How Colorado should use tax revenue from recreational sales was a hot topic before marijuana was legalized. So was how to prevent youth consumption of cannabis. In fact, both are still hot topics, and now Denver will use a portion of the taxes collected by the city to fund marijuana prevention education in twenty after-school and summer programs around the city.

Fri
15
Jun

Colorado's bold new medical marijuana law for students

In Colorado, House Bill 1286 was signed into law by Governor Hickenlooper, allowing school nurses to administer medical marijuana to students with a medical marijuana card if their parents have a written agreement with the principal. According to The Denver Post Hickenlooper agreed to sign the bill because medical marijuana would not “end up in the hands of other students.” He had spoken to parents and children who receive medical marijuana and found their “reasoning and advocacy very compelling.”

Wed
13
Jun

Colorado's Governor just said 'no' to cannabis cafes

While state officials won't allow people to consume cannabis in public establishments, Denver has other ideas.

Colorado managed to get a bill all the way to Governor John Hickenlooper’s desk that would have allowed the licensing of public cannabis cafes where consumers could use small amounts of marijuana. The game-changing bill would have made Colorado the first state in the nation to have such a law. However, this week Hickenlooper vetoed it. The move further highlighted one of the most contentious battles in the marijuana industry—establishing laws that allow those who purchase marijuana to also consume it at specially licensed establishments. 

Tue
12
Jun

What east coast cannabis entrepreneurs can learn from Colorado

Marijuana industry veterans from the Rocky Mountains offer some blunt advice.

East Coast Cannabis markets are getting ready to expand in a major way. In recent weeks, Massachusetts, New Jersey, Connecticut, Vermont, Florida, and even New York have been showing signs of progress. For many budding east coast cannabis entrepreneurs, this momentum has been a long-time coming.

The excitement was palpable earlier this month at the Cannabis World Congress & Business Exposition (CWCBE) in New York City. Thousands of entrepreneurs and industry experts descended on the Big Apple to attend the marijuana expo and educational networking trade show for the legalized cannabis and hemp industries. 

Tue
12
Jun

Denver Vape and Play could be Denver's second official pot lounge

In September 2017, a group of friends announced their intention to apply for Denver's first social cannabis consumption license, with the goal of opening a pot-friendly gaming lounge. Although it took a little longer than expected, the group behind Denver Vape and Play finally turned in their application for a Cannabis Consumption Establishment license on Thursday, June 7.

Mon
11
Jun

NJ marijuana legalization: How legal weed states get around federal ban on marijuana

It's the problem faced by every single marijuana dispensary in the nine states that already sell marijuana for recreational purposes.

The fact is, "legal weed" isn't entirely legal. And if New Jersey legalizes marijuana, it will come with unique challenges  — and solutions — for those looking to find success in cannabis.

The U.S. Department of Justice still considers marijuana a "Schedule 1" drug, a classification that indicates it has no medicinal value, despite 29 states having some kind of medical marijuana program.

Fri
08
Jun

Marijuana test strips give immediate indication of pot

There’s a new way for parents, teachers and others to see if someone they know has been using marijuana. It’s a test kit already being used by schools and police departments around the country.

These are a similar type of strips that have been used in airports to test for explosives. Now, those strips have been redesigned to test for marijuana in schools like Yampah Mountain High School, an alternative school in Glenwood Springs.

Leigh McGown is the principal. She told CBS4 Investigator Rick Sallinger, like at other schools, she has had to confiscate numerous items and wondered what they contained.

”It would be very hard for me to know if this one has marijuana in it these containers have marijuana in it,” she said.

Wed
06
Jun

School nurses in Colorado can now administer medical cannabis

An impactful modification to a pre-existing law will enable more pediatric medical marijuana patients to get the medicine and education they need.

Yet again, the state of Colorado is ahead of the curve—at least, in terms of increased access to medical marijuana. Thanks to a new bill, school nurses in Colorado can now administer medical cannabis, as long as parents give consent.

School Nurses in Colorado Can Administer Medical Cannabis If Parents Give the OK

Tue
05
Jun

Colorado governor vetoes marijuana ‘tasting rooms’ proposal

Colorado’s governor on Monday vetoed a bill to allow marijuana retailers to set up “tasting rooms,” dashing hopes that the state would be the first to adopt a system letting consumers use marijuana in public spaces.

Gov. John Hickenlooper has objected to similar bills in the past, arguing it could prompt a federal crackdown. He stayed quiet on the issue during the legislative session this year but wasn’t satisfied with the scaled-back proposal. In a letter explaining the veto, Hickelooper wrote that the bill could have resulted in more impaired drivers on Colorado’s roads and other public health risks.

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