Colombia

Fri
12
Jun

Video: What happened when Portugal decriminalised drugs

For 20 years The Economist has led calls for a rethink on drug prohibition. This film looks at new approaches to drugs policy, from Portugal to Colorado. “Drugs: War or Store?” kicks off our new “Global Compass” series, examining novel approaches to policy problems.
 

Sat
06
Jun

International Summit Highlights Contradictions in Drug Policy Debate

An international drug control summit in Colombia has again placed the contradictions in rapidly changing thinking on drug policy at center stage, as calls for drug users and producers not to be criminalized clashed with plans to increase efforts to tackle drug cultivation. 

Tue
02
Jun

Silk Road Reduced Violence in the Drug Trade, Study Argues

THE DARK WEB may have a silver lining, according to a pair of academics: A new class of geekier, less violent drug dealers.

A law professor and a professor of criminal science argue, in a paper released online, that by reducing physical contact between drug dealers—particularly between dealers and their suppliers—the Silk Road’s bustling Web-based narcotics trade may have prevented bloodshed that would have occurred in the street-level illegal drug market.

Sun
31
May

Decades of drug war have brought only crisis

The new visibility of police violence toward African-Americans in the United States has stoked public debate about policing: What about body cameras? Should we reform police training? Perhaps we should go slow on all that military gear?

I find it almost impossible to sit through any of this while the underlying issue goes unaddressed: It’s the drug economy, stupid.

Wed
27
May

Latin America Rethinks Drug Policies

During the 1980s and 1990s, as the United States battled the scourge of cocaine throughout the hemisphere, Washington did most of the talking. Latin American governments were forced to listen and fall in line. The American government had the most money to throw at the problem, the toughest justice system and the biggest bully pulpit.

Mon
18
May

Latin American Allies Resist U.S. Strategy in Drug Fight

BOGOTÁ, Colombia — Colombia just discarded a cornerstone of the American-backed fight against drugs, blocking the aerial spraying of coca, the plant used to make cocaine. Bolivia kicked out the United States Drug Enforcement Administration years ago and allows farmers to grow small amounts of the crop.

Sun
03
May

Massive march in Medellin Columbia for the "Day of Pot"

The Marijuana March became a total carnival. In its seventh year and as in previous years, participants stressed the need to take the step to legalization.

Fri
24
Apr

The Global Marijuana March Begins May 2, 2015

The Global Marijuana March (GMM) is kicking off at different locations across the world taking place this year on Saturday May 2, 2015 and include marches, meetings, rallies, concerts, festivals and other relevant information and events relating to cannabis.

The Global Marijuana March began in 1999 which have had hundreds of thousands of people participated in over 829 different cities in 72 countries worldwide since its inception.

The Global Marijuana March is a celebration embracing cannabis culture as a personal lifestyle choice. Participants unite to discuss, promote, entertain and educate both consumers and non-consumers alike.

Fri
24
Apr

Slideshow: Push to legalize marijuana in Latin America

Two years ago Uruguay became the first country on the planet to okay the use of marijuana. This caused neighboring countries throughout Latin America to rethink their drug policies, and for pro-marijuana supporters to push even hard for legislation to decriminalize weed and make herb smoking and growing a legal act.

While many countries have made it a little easier for casual marijuana smokers to puff freely, there’s still some resistance to all all-out okay to cannabis use.

Click through the slideshow about to see which countries have adopted looser rules regarding marijuana and whether Uruguay will remain the legal-weed country.

Mon
20
Apr

Three Ex-Cops Smoke Marijuana On Camera, Give Their Real Thoughts On Prohibition

Three men who identify themselves as former police officers smoke marijuana and get high on camera in a new video released in time for "420," the annual marijuana holiday.

All of the men say that they had previously smoked weed, but not for decades. And while none recalled arresting anyone for a marijuana crime during their law enforcement career, one did remember seizing "a lot of pot" from people.

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