Austria

Fri
22
Jan

A Brief History Of Medical Cannabis: From Ancient Anesthesia To The Modern Dispensary

For many decades in the U.S., marijuana has been painted as the psychedelic drug of hippies and stoners who lay around smoking dope to the detriment of their cognitive function. This image of marijuana use can certainly be attributed to one aspect of its culture, but Cannabis — a category of plants that include three species and seven sub-species — have been used in medicine for thousands of years.

Sat
05
Dec

Marijuana plantation found near Vienna police dog center

VIENNA (AP) — Vienna police say they have discovered a plantation with more than 700 marijuana plants at a warehouse close to a police dog center.

Police say one of their dogs caught a whiff of the plants in the Austrian capital's Floridsdorf district on Friday morning. Officers then saw a man taking a hose into the warehouse and searched the premises, finding 734 cannabis plants.

They said in a statement Saturday they also found 32 sacks stuffed with deep-frozen marijuana and a bag full of dried marijuana at the 27-year-old suspect's apartment.

Police say the man is denying wrongdoing. Spokesman Roman Hahslinger told the Austria Press Agency the suspect comes from outside Vienna and might not have known that a police facility was nearby.

Wed
02
Dec

The flowering embassy in the heart of Vienna

One almost never sees potent cannabis plants flowering in public and while this was a common sight almost everywhere only 80 years ago, it is now banned in most corners of the earth. Until recently, the Hash Marihuana & Hemp Museums in Amsterdam and Barcelona, the Cannabis College in Amsterdam, the Hemp Museum in Berlin, and the Museo Della Civilta Contadina in Bologna were the only places in the world either solely devoted to the heyday of cannabis, or actually permitted to display real cannabis plants.

Tue
17
Nov

Time in German prison altered pot activist’s life

MEDFORD — A German prison was the last place Alex Rogers expected to find himself shortly after marrying his Slovenian bride.

Three weeks earlier, on Dec. 19, 2005, the Ashland resident was in Medford, where he had married Tina Rogers. Gathered around him at the family home were his parents, Hank and Charlotte Rogers, and his sister, Paige, who was attending Princeton University. Retired Judge Ray White performed the ceremony.

The couple returned to Europe and landed Jan. 13, 2006, in Salzburg, Austria, where authorities arrested Rogers on an international warrant related to the sale of 50 pounds of marijuana a couple of years earlier. It was Friday the 13th.

Tue
10
Nov

The UN General Assembly Special Session on Drugs (UNGASS) 2016

The ‘General Assembly’ is the principle policy-making organ of the United Nations (UN), and the only one in which all 193 UN member states have equal representation. At the request of member states, it convenes UN General Assembly Special Sessions (UNGASS) on specific issues. There was an UNGASS on drugs in 1998 at which member states agreed on a Political Declaration on Global Drug Control.

Sat
24
Oct

High times for dagga as medicine: fears go up in smoke!

Any way you look at it, dagga is medicine. Even if you smoke it just to get “high”, the South African weed won’t just alter your consciousness.

It has a host of other powerful pharmacologic effects on body and mind, which make it medicine by definition.

Depending on which side of the legalisation or criminalisation fence you sit on, you’ll see those effects in a good or bad light.

“The dagga couple”, as the media have dubbed activists Julian Stobbs and Myrtle Clark, sit on the side of the fence bathed in the glow of a good light. They are part of an influential legalisation campaign in South Africa that has spread faster than the weed grows, and now includes medical doctors, psychologists, lawyers, and other interested parties.

Sat
24
Oct

The economic case for decriminalising drugs

Is it better to have drug use made legal, and therefore taxed and regulated, or might this encourage more drugs to be consumed – with the social and other costs associated with that? 

The UN wants its members to decriminalise drugs, and Sir Richard Branson thinks that is just great. Well, it is not quite like that; as so often, the story is more nuanced than the headline. The paper Sir Richard leaked, which urges “decriminalising drug use and possession for personal consumption”, was drawn up for a conference in Kuala Lumpur on harm reduction by Dr Monica Beg, an official at the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC) in Vienna. It has since been withdrawn and, as you can gather from the outcry, it is certainly a “third-rail issue” – you touch it at your peril.

Sat
24
Oct

Endogenous "cannabis" influences development of the fetal pancreas

According to the latest research results from the Medical University of Vienna, endocannabinoids, cannabis-like substances produced by the body itself, can affect the development of a baby's pancreas. The study also highlights the importance of diet during pregnancy for the foetal pancreas to form. These are the findings of a recent study that has now been published in the journal, PNAS.

Thu
17
Sep

Cannabis activists to march through Vienna

Austrian cannabis activists are holding a ‘social march’ in Vienna on Saturday 19th September to protest against the planned reform of drug laws which will still criminalize patients who use cannabis to treat pain and symptoms of disease.

Organisers expect up to 10,000 people to join the march, which begins at 1pm at Museumsquartier, and will then progress along the Ringstrasse, crossing the Aspernbrücke and ending up in the Prater on Jesuitenwiese at 6pm, for an 'after-party'.

Fri
28
Aug

Austrian Mayor Wants €100 Fine for Cannabis Users

The Mayor of Graz wants to introduce €100 administrative fines for people caught with small amounts of cannabis in a bid to tackle drug dealing in the city.

The proposal from Mayor Siegfried Nagl (ÖVP) is a direct challenge to the amended National Narcotics Act, which says people caught with small amounts of cannabis should be provided treatment from the health department rather than be punished.

Nagl says that these amendments, which will come into effect on January 1, will cause administrative headaches while not curbing “a single dealer”, adding: “The law is bad, it is bureaucratic and will incur costs.”

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