Arizona

Mon
08
Jun

Customs officials nab teen with marijuana in bicycle's tires at Douglas border crossing

DOUGLAS, Ariz. –  Customs officials in the border town of Douglas arrested a 17-year-old boy after finding his bicycle's tires stuffed with more than three pounds of marijuana.

U.S. Customs and Border Protection officials say officers at the Douglas Port of Entry arrested the boy Saturday.

They say the Douglas boy was handed over to Homeland Security Investigations agents.

Officials say agents also made several large drug seizures at border crossings over the weekend.

Agents in Nogales found three pounds of heroin in a man's luggage on Saturday, and the next day arrested a 14-year-old Mexican girl who had two pounds of methamphetamine under her clothes.

Mon
08
Jun

Potlines app helps marijuana users stay on the right path

Potlines is an app that will send users an alert as to differing state marijuana laws.

 

WASHINGTON, June 7, 2015 – Marijuana is already legal for medical and recreational use in the District of Columbia. Alaska, Oregon, Washington and Colorado also allow recreational use and possession of cannabis.

Twenty-three states from Maine to California allow medical marijuana use. But if you are taking a road trip from the NorthEastern shore to Southern California, there are a lot of states in between where marijuana is still illegal.

The laws are constantly changing and  the laws for use and possession in those states is not uniform.

And ignorance of the law is not a legal defense.

Mon
08
Jun

Tommy Chong introduces his Wellness medical marijuana brand in Arizona

PHOENIX (KSAZ) -

Comedian Tommy Chong was in the valley Saturday, appearing at an event dedicated to promoting wellness through medical marijuana. 

The Arizona Cannabis for Wellness festival was held at the Encanto Green Cross dispensary in Phoenix near 27th Avenue and Encanto.

Chong, who is well known for his pot-themed "Cheech and Chong" comedy movies, introduced his brand of wellness marijuana.

Sat
06
Jun

New Poll Shows Majority Of Arizonans Support Ending Marijuana Prohibition

PHOENIX — An independent poll released Wednesday shows a majority of Arizona residents support ending marijuana prohibition.

The Behavior Research Center’s latest Rocky Mountain Poll found 53% of Arizonans support making possession of a small amount of marijuana legal for personal use. Just 39% are opposed. Support outpaced opposition in all three of the geographical areas that were surveyed: 53-38 in Maricopa County; 47-43 in Pima County; and 58-38 in Rural Arizona. The survey of 701 Arizonans was conducted from April 29-May 15 and has a margin of error of plus or minus 3.8%.

Fri
05
Jun

Arizona: Sheila Polk Rolls Out Propaganda at Marijuana Policy Talk

Sheila Polk, Yavapai County Attorney and the state's chief marijuana opponent, found her so-called facts about marijuana falling flat in a legalization discussion hosted by Arizona State University on Thursday.

Fri
05
Jun

Poll shows AZ voters approve recreational marijuana, medical research

The latest Rocky Mountain Poll shows slightly more than half of Arizona voters favor legalizing marijuana for recreational use, and 80 percent support its use for research.

It's a controversial drug that one local doctor says has been labeled "schedule one" for no reason. Marijuana has been deemed medically useless without any scientific evidence.

The latest Rocky Mountain Poll, released Wednesday, shows slightly more than half of Arizona voters favor legalizing marijuana for recreational use.

The same study show an 83 percent supports to allow Arizona's universities to conduct medical research on marijuana in the treatment of post-traumatic stress disorder.

Fri
05
Jun

Should medical marijuana cards be allowed as a DUI defense?

Arizona is one of the 23 states in the nation that has legalized medical marijuana use, but how far does that law go?

KTAR News 92.3 FM's legal analyst Monica Lindstrom spoke with Mac and Gaydos Thursday about whether or not the presence of a medical marijuana card should be used as a defense in court.

The Arizona Supreme Court recently announced they will review an appeals court decision that said drivers found with marijuana in their system can be prosecuted under the law -- even if they possess a medical marijuana card.

"I think that we're going to see the law change to allow (medical marijuana cards) to be (used as a DUI defense)," Lindstrom said. "I don't think it will happen anytime soon, but down the road we're going to see that."

Thu
04
Jun

Medical marijuana cards should be allowed as defense in DUI cases

The Arizona Supreme Court recently agreed to review an appeals court decision that decided drivers who have medical marijuana cards can be prosecuted for driving under the influence if they’re found to have marijuana in their system.

In two cases, defendants who had medical marijuana cards argued they should be able to use their medical marijuana cards as defense like other prescription drugs are used.  But, the District One appeals court disagreed.

Sun
31
May

Arizona: Marijuana the focus of June 4 roundtable discussion

PHOENIX — Marijuana — a potential 2016 ballot initiative regarding its proposed legalization — will be the focus of a June 4 roundtable discussion hosted by Morrison Institute for Public Policy.

Marijuana presently is legal in Arizona if prescribed by a doctor for medicinal purposes only. The roundtable panel will discuss the current status of legal medical marijuana in Arizona and explore questions surrounding potential future legalization of recreational marijuana.

Thu
28
May

Marijuana researcher being denied opportunity to lecture at Phoenix VA

PHOENIX -- Phoenix Veterans Affairs officials are blocking an Arizona-based medical marijuana researcher from giving a lecture to health care providers at the facility.

Dr. Sue Sisley has requested permission on multiple occasions to give a so-called Grand Rounds Lecture at the Phoenix VA.

During the lecture, Sisley said she would have an opportunity to explain the details of her study of the effects of marijuana on veterans with PTSD to the facility's medical staff.

"They have the golden opportunity to refer military veterans to a federally legal study," Sisley said of why she wants to deliver the lecture.

When asked why Sisley has not been allowed a Grand Rounds Lecture, Phoenix VA Director Glen Grippen said, "She has already done that."

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