Africa

Mon
21
May

Zimbabwe government suspends cannabis farming licensing

Government has suspended the licensing and growing of marijuana — popularly known as mbanje.

Last month, President Emmerson Mnangagwa’s administration gazetted licence fees for those interested in growing cannabis (mbanje) for research and medicinal purposes.

This was seen as part of strategies to shore up revenue flows to the depressed fiscus.

The development, which had divided opinion in the hugely polarised southern African nation, had made Zimbabwe the second country in Africa to legalise cultivation of the plant after the tiny kingdom of Lesotho announced the continent’s first licence to grow cannabis legally last year.

Until now, it had been illegal to grow, possess or use cannabis in Zimbabwe, with offenders facing up to 12 years in jail.

Tue
08
May

What South African businesses need to know about cannabis oil

In March 2017, Justice Dennis Davis handed down a judgment in the Western Cape High Court that declared sections of the Drugs and Drug Trafficking Act, invalid and unconstitutional.

Specifically he took issue with the provisions that prohibit private and personal use of dagga at home as a violation of the right to privacy.

Mon
30
Apr

Zimbabwe just became the second country in Africa to legalize cannabis cultivation

The Zimbabwean government this week published a licensing regime that will allow the legal cultivation of cannabis, state-owned newspaper The Herald reported on Saturday

Growing mbanje, as dagga is commonly known in Zim, will be legal for research and medical use under the new regulations, Statutory Instrument 62 of 2018, "Dangerous Drugs – Production of Cannabis for Medicinal and Scientific Use Regulations".

Zimbabwe has been considering such partial legalisation for the last eight months.

Tue
06
Mar

Tilray begins exporting medicinal-cannabis extract to South Africa, taking B.C. marijuana to five continents

Tilray has added South Africa to the list of countries where it’s exporting made-in-B.C. medicinal cannabis and extracts.

“With this announcement, Tilray products are now available in nine countries on five continents,” the company’s CEO, Brendan Kennedy, said quoted in a media release.

“This export is another strategic milestone as we aim to build the world’s leading medical cannabis brand. We are encouraged by the evolving regulations pertaining to cannabis in South Africa and around the world and are pleased to make our pharmaceutical-grade products available to qualified patients in need in throughout the country.”

Fri
09
Feb

US Corp cashes in as Lesotho becomes the First African country to legalize Cannabis cultivation

Rhizo Sciences announces construction of 400,000 square foot export facility in Lesotho, Africa to meet growing international medical cannabis export demand.

Rhizo Sciences LLC, a Seattle, Washington based medical cannabis company today announced plans to partner with Medi Kingdom Holdings (Pty) Ltd to build the $50M medical cannabis export facility in Lesotho, Africa.

Mon
04
Dec

Tourists roll up for Morocco's cannabis trail

It may not feature in Morocco's official tourism brochures but cannabis attracts thousands of visitors a year to the North African country. At a hotel bar in the northern region of Ketama, German tourist Beatrix made no attempt to hide the joint she was rolling.

The 57-year-old said she had fallen in love with the area for "the quality of its hashish and the friendliness of its residents". Hassan, a 40-something sporting a conspicuous gold watch, said cannabis was "our main source of wealth".

Fri
17
Nov

Marijuana: The Congo's new cash crop

Before he started growing weed, Congolese planter Koti spent his days digging holes and tunnels, mining for morsels of gold. He would smoke weed — or bangi as he calls it — to overcome his fear of the darkness that he faced underground.

As a teen, he saw a tunnel collapse, trapping five fellow miners — only one was rescued. “It’s dangerous,” says Koti, of the illegal minerals trade that many eastern Congolese families depend on. “People were dying.”

Tue
14
Nov

ConCourt to decide if cannabis should be completely legalized in South Africa

South Africa’s Constitutional Court (ConCourt) will today hear the arguments for the complete legalisation of dagga (the African term for cannabis) across the country.

Julian Stobbs and Myrtle Clarke have fought numerous legal battles over the years to have the plant decriminalised. Stobbs and Clarke have even been dubbed the ‘dagga couple’, given their persistence to have the law recognise dagga as a legal substance.

However, they have since been empowered by a ruling earlier this year. Back in March, the Western Cape High Court passed a landmark ruling. The court declared that it is an “infringement to ban the use of dagga by adults in private homes.”

Thu
12
Oct

Medical marijuana a huge opportunity for Africa

All African nations are capable of cultivating medicinal marijuana to exploit a growing international acceptance of cannabis-based medicines. 

The current global market for marijuana products is US$3 billion and is expected to rise to US$56 billion as more countries and US states join the legalisation trend. 

African nations are reluctant to get in on the business, with conservative governments fearful of encouraging recreational drug use. Cultivation of a different kind is now a reality with Africa’s first license to legally deal in medicinal marijuana issued by Lesotho. 

Tue
10
Oct

The green gold rush: Could Africa be on the verge of a weed race?

Several African governments are considering tapping a lucrative natural resource.

More than 10,000 tons of cannabis are produced on the continent each year, according to a UN survey, which advocates believe could be worth billions of dollars in a rapidly expanding global market for legal weed.

African governments have not yet followed the trend of legalization seen in Europe and the Americas. But Lesotho's recent announcement of the continent's first legal license to grow marijuana is part of a wider shift toward more liberal policies.

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