Marijuana Politics

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Tue
18
Aug

Washington's top marijuana advisor steps down

As deputy director of the Washington Liquor Control Board, Randy Simmons helped craft the state's retail marijuana program. He's decided to step down.

The veteran bureaucrat who helped implement Washington's marijuana law is stepping down.

Randy Simmons, deputy director of the Washington Liquor Control Board, told Seattle Times staff writer Bob Young that this year's difficult legislative session played a factor in his decision. Battles erupted over the plan to fold the state's mostly unregulated medical marijuana industry into the regulated retail one.

Tue
18
Aug

Ohio prepares to vote on marijuana legalization: which states will be next?

With legalized recreational marijuana riding a winning streak since 2012, California, Massachusetts and Arizona are among top contenders to OK the substance – and more states could follow.

Ohio officials approved a bid last week to get recreational and medical marijuana legalization on the 3 November ballot. Thus far, Ohio is the only state where voters will consider pot legalization in the 2015 election. But that’s not because many states aren’t already eyeing their own marijuana campaigns.

Tue
18
Aug

4 States That Would Soon Legalize Marijuana

Medical and Recreational Marijuana have been on the loop and is currently making its way towards legalization all througout America. Numerous states have agreed in having 'pot' legalized as they recognized its benefits, though proper protocol needs to be observed in the legalization of pot. Listed below are the states that would soon have 'Marijuana' legalized as per Marijuana World News and 24/7 Wallstreet.

Ohio

Tue
18
Aug

What happens if both marijuana legalization and anti-monopoly amendments pass?

COLUMBUS, Ohio -- Ohio voters in November will face two constitutional amendments that conflict with one another.

One -- a citizen-initiated amendment -- would legalize a new marijuana industry dependent on 10 predetermined growing sites. Another, which state lawmakers put on the ballot, seeks to block that business model.

What happens if they both pass?

The Ohio Constitution says if two conflicting amendments on the same ballot pass, the one that gets the most votes becomes law. But the constitution also says citizen-initiated amendments, such as the marijuana legalization amendment, become law 30 days after an election while legislature-sponsored amendments become law immediately.

Tue
18
Aug

Residents to speak out on planned Plymouth, NH marijuana dispensary

More than 100 people packed into the town hall in Plymouth on Monday night, where the first public forum about a planned medical marijuana dispensary was held.

Sanctuary ATC, the nonprofit that would run the dispensary, gave residents details about how the facility would work and why they selected Plymouth.

Residents also had the chance to give their opinions on having medical marijuana for sale in their town.

Monday's meeting was part of a series of public meetings in towns where dispensaries and marijuana growing operations are proposed hosted by the state.

Some dispensaries have selected where they would like to operate, and residents will have a chance to say what they think.

Tue
18
Aug

Protesting medical cannabis injustice in Australia

The protest was one of many dotted around the country, stemming from a case involving Craig Goodwin in Taree. 

Mr Goodwin had been arrested for a cultivation offence to make cannabis oil, despite being a registered carer under the Terminal Illness Cannabis Scheme (or TICS). 

Local men Rodd Green and Ron McCready stood on the steps at Bendigo’s law courts to protest what they saw as a grave miscarriage of justice.

Mr Green said using the non-psychoactive strains of the controversial drug – the CBCs or cannabichromene – could drastically relieve pain. 

“I use medical cannabis oil for chronic post traumatic stress and a broken back in 1995,” Mr Green said. 

“If it wasn't for the powers of medical cannabis, I wouldn't be alive today.”

Tue
18
Aug

5 myths about marijuana

Let’s break down some myths about marijuana:

Myth 1: Marijuana use is harmless.

Today’s marijuana is far more potent than the plant of the past.

New strains are being crossbred to produce higher levels of tetrahydrocannabinol — the chemical responsible for marijuana’s effects — than ever before, with some reaching 20 to 30 percent THC (as compared with the average 1 percent THC in the 1970s).

We don’t yet know the full extent to which increased levels of THC will affect the brain and the body. However, the National Institute on Drug Abuse cautions that it could lead to higher rates of addiction and adverse health consequences.

Mon
17
Aug

Target of medical marijuana raid: 'I feel like I have been raped'

APACHE COUNTY, AZ (KPHO/KTVK) -

"I feel like I have been raped and given a death sentence," says 54-year-old medical marijuana patient Gregg Levendoski.

Levendoski -- who is HIV positive, has hepatitis C and multiple forms of cancer -- said he was victimized last week when a task force of some 60 law officers, including SWAT teams, raided his remote and isolated property in Apache County at about 4 a.m. It was a multi-agency operation meant to find illegally grown marijuana.

Mon
17
Aug

Rauner Makes Amendatory Vetoes To Marijuana Bills

Republican Illinois Gov. Bruce Rauner made changes to two state bills involving marijuana on Friday via amendatory vetoes.

One of the bills looks to make possession of 15 grams or less of marijuana an offense punishable by a $55 to $125 fine in the state. Using his veto authority, Rauner decreased the amount of marijuana someone could possess to 10 grams and increased the fines to between $100 and $200. 

The governor said he backed the "fundamental purposes" of the measure, but said that this type of adjustment to drug policy "must be made carefully and incrementally."

Mon
17
Aug

Medical Marijuana Arrests: When Will It End?

Some people try to forget the day they were arrested for marijuana possession but, with the hindsight of four decades, I can say it was one of the best things that ever happened to us.

It was August 24, 1975 and my husband, Robert C. Randall, and I were living a rather ordinary life, just eight blocks from the U.S. Capitol in Washington, D.C. in a neighborhood that could kindly be referred to as "pre-gentrification." The Metropolitan Police executed the warrant, ransacked our house and removed six marijuana plants from our sun deck. It was, of course, traumatic and life-changing.

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