Marijuana Politics

Synonyms: 
congress
senate
police
obama
rand paul
political
Tue
14
Jul

South Africa: Pupil's Expulsion for Dagga - School Takes On KZN Education Dept

Maritzburg College's resolve to expel a Grade 11 pupil, who admitted to two dagga offences, among other things, has been stifled by the KwaZulu-Natal education department.

The school says the department still has to make a decision on an appeal by the boy's father for leniency. It says the department has taken an "unreasonably long" time to decide on the matter.

The case was before the KwaZulu-Natal High Court in Pietermaritzburg, which on Tuesday directed the MEC for education to decide on the appeal lodged by the father.

The school argued that the MEC's delay of nearly three months is "unreasonably long".

Tue
14
Jul

Why are the politicians ignoring the will of the people ?

Washington, DC: Members of the US House of Representativesnarrowly defeateda proposed amendment that sought to allow veterans greater access to cannabis therapy.

House members rejected the amendment by a vote of 210 to 213. One hundred and seventy-five Democrats voted for the measure, while eight voted against it. Thirty-five Republicans voted for the amendment, while 205 voted against it.

Tue
14
Jul

Feds Should Legalize Hemp Farming, Too

Federal authorities are way behind the bush on dealing with hemp, but an increasing number of states, now including Connecticut, have it right.

The General Assembly passed a bill this spring that legalizes industrial hemp. Hemp can now be grown, used and sold here. This is good news, because hemp is a remarkably versatile agricultural product, but it comes with a major caveat — it is still illegal under federal law. Should an enterprising Connecticut farmer plant a field of industrial hemp, federal agents could swoop in and pull up the (harmless) plants.

This is idiotic. Industrial hemp should be legal, period.

Tue
14
Jul

Only legalization can win the war on drugs

Prohibition was a failure in the 1920s, and, for similar reasons, the so-called war on drugs has been a disaster. Forty years after U.S. President Richard Nixon declared this war, consumption worldwide is up, violence has increased and the rule of law has collapsed, especially in Latin America.

Basic economics tells us that when there is artificial pressure on supply, prices go up and margins increase — the perfect incentives for criminal activities. The same mistake was made in the United States almost a century ago with Prohibition. As early as 1925, some observers started to see that this policy, far from stopping crime, was leading to the formation of large networks of well-funded crime syndicates.

Tue
14
Jul

Colombian Marijuana Farmers Fear Chaos When Guerrillas Disband

(Bloomberg) -- Farmers deep in a drug-producing region in the Andes Mountains in southwest Colombia have been badly hit by fighting between the government and Marxist rebels. One might, therefore, expect them to be hopeful that a peace deal to end the conflict would improve their lives. Instead, they are worried. Bloomberg’s Matthew Bristow reports (Source: Bloomberg) (Corrects spelling of Cauca in video.)

Deep in the Andes mountains in southwest Colombia, where Marxist rebels have ruled for decades, school children are issued white flags for evacuation during firefights that break out with the army.

Tue
14
Jul

Marijuana opponents using racketeering law to fight industry

DENVER (AP) — A federal law crafted to fight the mob is giving marijuana opponents a new strategy in their battle to stop the expanding industry: racketeering lawsuits.

A Colorado pot shop recently closed after a Washington-based group opposed to legal marijuana sued not just the pot shop but a laundry list of firms doing business with it — from its landlord and accountant to the Iowa bonding company guaranteeing its tax payments. One by one, many of the defendants agreed to stop doing business with Medical Marijuana of the Rockies, until the mountain shop closed its doors and had to sell off its pot at fire-sale prices.

Tue
14
Jul

Warren pushes feds to ease restrictions on marijuana research

Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.) wants to make it easier for government-paid researchers to study marijuana – and not just its negative side effects.

Eight Democratic senators, led by Warren, are urging federal health and drug officials to address the “data shortfall” on potential health benefits of medical marijuana by making it easier for researchers to study the drug.

Medical use of marijuana is now legal in 23 states, though it is difficult to study because it remains one of the country’s most tightly controlled substances.

Tue
14
Jul

How Ottawa created the ‘wild west’ of medical marijuana

Federal Health Minister Rona Ambrose can’t seem to catch a break. First, Kimberley, B.C., grants a business licence to a medical cannabis dispensary and then Vancouver City Council votes to regulate and license medical cannabis dispensaries. Coupled with the recent Supreme Court of Canada ruling that patients can possess all forms of cannabis for medical purposes, Ms. Ambrose is left with feelings of sheer “outrage.”

Tue
14
Jul

Morgan & Morgan ponies up for medical marijuana again

A political committee leading a renewed effort to pass a constitutional amendment to legalize medical marijuana raised nearly $293,000 in June, with about $233,000 of the money coming from an Orlando law firm headed by prominent trial attorney John Morgan, according to a newly filed report. The committee, People United for Medical Marijuana, is spearheading an effort to pass a medical-marijuana ballot initiative in November 2016, after narrowly failing to pass a similar constitutional amendment in 2014.

Tue
14
Jul

Utah: Libertas Institute Hosts Public Forum On Medical Cannabis

ST. GEORGE — The Libertas Institute, an organization dedicated to advancing the cause of liberty in the state of Utah, will hold a public forum on proposals to legalize medical cannabis Thursday at 7 p.m. in the Dixie Center St. George, 1835 S. Convention Center Drive, St. George.

According to a press release from the Libertas Institute, this will be the third in a series of public forums on the issue. The first, which was held in Ogden, focused on the law enforcement aspect of legalizing medical marijauna. The second, held in Provo focused solely on patient stories.

Thursday’s forum will be more of a general event, Libertas Institute President Connor Boyack said, adding that it will broadly touch on a lot of the issues.

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Marijuana Politics