Cannabis Technology News

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technology
Thu
23
May

Facebook will not allow cannabis sales on its platform

After roughly three months of internal and external deliberations, Facebook Inc. decided Tuesday to continue attempting to block the sale of marijuana on its platform.

At its weekly product policy meeting, executives and staff in Ireland, Washington D.C., Kenya, Los Angeles and Facebook headquarters in Menlo Park — roughly 60 people total — ran through the relative merits and concerns with allowing content touting cannabis sales and selling weed directly, with a MarketWatch reporter in attendance. Ultimately, they determined that Facebook would not alter its policies, but staffers plan to make several changes to the way it handles the platform’s current marijuana content rules.

Thu
23
May

TheWeedTube successfully launches into Apple App Store

A new milestone has been reached in the battle for high quality, readily available cannabis-related content: TheWeedTube, a cannabis video and news platform created and curated by dozens of former YouTube creators who were kicked off the Google-owned site during its drug-related video purge, is now available in the Apple App Store.

Thu
23
May

IDT Australia secures medical cannabis manufacturing licence

IDT Australia Limited’s (ASX:IDT) securing of a medicinal cannabis manufacturing licence is also good news for another Australian cannabusiness.

IDT announced on Monday Australia’s Office of Drug Control granted it the licence under the Narcotic Drugs Act 1967.  The licence will allow the company to manufacture of extracts and tinctures of cannabis and cannabis resin, and engage in other related activities including supply, packaging, transport, storage and possession.

Thu
23
May

Canada pledging $24.5 million to fund research on cannabis and health

The Canadian government wants to learn more about the health benefits and risks of marijuana use, ponying up a significant amount of money to help support research.

On Wednesday, the Canadian Institutes of Health Research announced it would be dropping roughly $24.5 million to bolster cannabis research. The money will help support 26 projects throughout Canada “that cover topics such as the use of cannabis and cannabidiol (CBD) oil for the treatment of pain and anxiety,” according to a press release from the agency.

Thu
23
May

Potential side effects of CBD that users should know

The legalization of medical marijuana in 33 U.S. states has paved the way to the growing popularity of cannabis and the products derived from it, such as cannabidiol. Also known as CBD, this cannabis-derived substance has received praises by researchers and doctors for its growing list of health and wellness benefits. Because of CBD's increasing popularity, industry analysts predict it’s on its way to becoming a $22-billion market by 2022.

But even though CBD receives high praises for its incredible medical properties, users must still take note of its side effects. Like any substance used as a medicine, cannabidiol can cause harm to users, especially those who use it without the prescription and supervision of a doctor.

Wed
22
May

New study finds CBD significantly reduces opioid cravings in addicts

Coming off of a heroin addiction is notoriously difficult. But a new study suggests CBD can make it much easier. According to a study published Tuesday in the American Journal of Psychiatry, cannabidiol (CBD) can significantly reduce cravings in people addicted to opioids and manage withdrawal symptoms. Cravings and abstinence anxiety are two of the most critical features of addiction, and triggering them often contributes to relapses and continued drug use.

Wed
22
May

Superweed: The quest to create the ultimate premium strain

Probably the best, and certainly the most famous, grower in Canadian weed is a man named Remo Colasanti.

The 51-year-old from Maple Ridge, B.C., has been reading High Times since before he was legal drinking age. But he preferred hash to marijuana until the skunk strains proliferated in the Lower Mainland around 1985. Grown under powerful artificial lights in a hydroponic nutrient solution, they cost a princely $40 for 3.5 grams. They also looked, smelled and smoked better than anything that had come before — the difference between airplane lettuce and farmer’s market greens.

Wed
22
May

No smoking required

A growing list of different dosing products could change the way some medical and recreational users consume their cannabis.

“When you talk about medical cannabis, everybody thinks about Cheech and Chong and the bongs and combustible formats,” says Thomas Folan, a medical doctor and founder of SolaceMD, an online medical cannabis consultation platform. “But those of us putting our MD behind this business wouldn’t be doing so if that was where it was going.”

Instead, Canadians will soon be able to dose up on cannabinoids like THC or CBD, touted to have wide variety of therapeutic benefits, with products as discrete as a thin strip that dissolves in your mouth.

Wed
22
May

How cannabis companies can utilize mobile surveillance

In today’s world, cannabis business operations are complex, multifaceted affairs – this notion is heightened with the nuances of transport in the industry. With cannabis products still demanding a large price on the black market, and business operating in a “cash only” industry, cannabis companies have plenty to protect. As such, forward-looking security technology companies are implementing mobile surveillance systems for transporting sensitive assets. 

Wed
22
May

Scientists racing to create lab-grown synthetic cannabinoids, but cannabis plant not obsolete just yet

Kevin Chen spent much of the last two years attending every cannabis-related conference he could find, trying to convince investors about the potential of a scientific development he had come up with in his student lab at Concordia University: Using yeast to create cannabinoids such as CBD, a compound now widely used in cannabis-based ingestibles and pharmaceuticals.

A month before legalization, Chen finally struck gold — Organigram Holdings, a New-Brunswick-based licensed producer agreed to invest $10 million in Hyasynth Bio, Chen’s Montreal-based startup.

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