Synthetic CBD oil sickens dozens of people in Utah

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A recent report reveals that 52 people in the state of Utah fell sick after using falsely labeled, synthetic CBD products.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) discovered that these products were sold between October 2018 and January 2019 at various smoke shops around the Salt Lake City area. CBD oil is legal for people with epilepsy in Utah, but because of limited regulations there is currently no quality control system in place – as is the situation in most of the country.

Although unsettling, this certainly shouldn’t surprise anyone. Just last month we reported that a Pennsylvania woman is suing a popular CBD brand after testing positive for THC – the psychoactive component in the plant – at work. Multiple investigations by news stations around the country uncovered CBD products that were incorrectly labeled, some containing heavy metals and pesticides and others with no CBD at all.

In more than half of the possible Utah cases, the individual tested positive for a synthetic CBD compound called 4-CCB. Others reported using a product called “Yolo CBD Oil”, but investigators were unable to figure out what company manufactures this brand.

Real, legitimate CBD is a treasure trove of natural healing properties. It can be used to treat a myriad of ailments including anxiety, inflammation, epilepsy, and chronic pain. Synthetic cannabinoids, however, can be extremely risky and are known to have dangerous effects, both immediate and long-term.

Health officials are urging states to regulate cannabis extracts “to minimize the risk for recurrences of this emerging public health threat.” The FDA is already working with the public to establish legal framework that will monitor the safety of CBD in food, supplements, and certain hygiene products.

As unfortunate as it is, the only way to curtail the sale of snake oil CBD is with more government interference. Check back with us for all the latest regulatory changes.

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