New York

Tue
14
Apr

Marijuana Edibles Aren't Safe—But Neither Are Booze and Sugar

Last year, The Weed Eater column debuted on 4/20 with a promise to take readers on “a cannabis-fueled culinary journey.” Since then, we’ve made a gourmet marijuana meal at Hunter S. Thompson’s house, sampled Melissa Etheridge’s weed-infused wine, brewed up some pot-fueled bulletproof coffee, explored the Joy of Cooking (while really stoned), concocted strain-specific cannabis cocktails, examined the Grateful Dead’s lasting influence on how we eat, and even shared a meal with Nonna Marijuana, the 92-year-old queen of cannabis cuisine. But perhaps, amid all the munchies and merriment, we’ve failed to make clear something vitally important: Marijuana edibles aren’t safe.

Tue
14
Apr

Congress told the Justice Department to stop fighting medical marijuana. It didn't work.

Charles Lynch was running a legal medical marijuana dispensary in California — but that didn't stop the feds from raiding his store in 2007, throwing him in jail, and later placing him on home arrest, rendering him unable to find work and, as a result, leading to the loss of his home.

"I have no work and no money," Lynch, 52, told the New York Times's Erik Eckholm, "and I'm depending on others to survive."

Tue
14
Apr

North Carolina Vets Organize to Put Medical Marijuana Use on State GOP Platform

NEW YORK (MainStreet) -- Military veterans in North Carolina, especially around Fayetteville, a center of both active military personnel and vets, are now organizing to put marijuana legalization on the state's GOP platform.

Tue
14
Apr

After 50 Years of Smoking Marijuana, Her Life Turned Out Nicely

Catherine Hiller, author of "Just Say Yes: A Marijuana Memoir," at Prospect Park in Brooklyn, where she believes she first smoked marijuana in the 1960s. April 12, 2015 Side Street By DAVID GONZALEZ

As much as Catherine Hiller refuses to admit it, marijuana is a gateway drug. Seriously, after smoking more or less every day for the past 50 years, there had to be some consequences. Yet, she did not go to jail after a random police stop. She did not end up strung out on heroin, sprawled in an alley. She didn’t even binge-munch herself into obesity.

Her daily puffs led her to write a book, “Just Say Yes: A Marijuana Memoir.”

Tue
14
Apr

Modern Corp. officials discuss transforming Lewiston H2Gro site into medical marijuana facility

A few years ago, when Modern Corp.’s Chief Operating Officer Gary E. Smith was recovering from open-heart surgery, he used the company’s 12-acre H2Gro facility to walk and rebuild his strength. Even then, Modern was contemplating a risky investment of converting the structure to a sophisticated, medical marijuana production center.

Now, with the New York State Compassionate Care Act signed into law, formal rules and regulations in place and an application process under way, Smith and Modern are vying to become one of five, licensed growing operations in the state.

Two years from now, the leafy corridors of the greenhouse may no longer house the towering tomato plants, instead nurturing the strong-stalked cannabis and their oil rich, medicinal trichomes.

Mon
13
Apr

Marijuana Extract May Reduce Seizure Frequency In Children With Severe Epilepsy

While not everyone has warmed to the idea of treating medical conditions with marijuana, research continues to emerge supporting its benefits. This applies the most, perhaps, to children with severe conditions, who may benefit just as much as adults from medical marijuana treatment — even as concerns about its effects on their developing minds and bodies arise. But a new study shows how marijuana might still be used to treat children (and adults) with untreatable epilepsy, safely and without the drug’s typical effects.

Mon
13
Apr

High Times editor: ‘Colorado cannabis industry is an economic miracle’

High Times magazine’s New York-rooted editor-in-chief Dan Skye has spent plenty of time in Colorado researching and photographing the state’s medical and recreational systems, but his current, pre-Cannabis Cup trip to the state has been uncommonly eye-opening.

“The Colorado cannabis industry is an economic miracle,” Skye said Monday from a stop in Pueblo, where he’s meeting cannabis business owners and reporting on the state’s first-of-its-kind legalization. “Everyone in the United States is following Colorado’s lead.”

Mon
13
Apr

Medical marijuana rush targets Lower Hudson Valley

Health care leaders and entrepreneurs are competing for five licenses to grow and sell medical marijuana in New York as patients seek improved access to the drug

A $10 million construction project tied to selling medical marijuana to Lower Hudson Valley patients is unfolding about 60 miles northwest of White Plains.

Valley Agriceuticals, a company started by a team of health care and cannabis industry leaders, wants to build a marijuana grow facility in Wallkill, a farming community of about 29,000 people in Orange County.

Mon
13
Apr

If Marijuana Is Medicine, Why Can't We Buy It in Pharmacies?

The popular explanation for medical marijuana dispensaries that have popped up in states from Washington to New York is that marijuana is a wonder drug — treating not just nausea and lack of appetite, but also pain, anxiety, epileptic seizures, and the symptoms of multiple sclerosis and schizophrenia.

The federal government refuses to allow people to use it, proponents say. 

The story, however, isn’t quite so simple.

Fri
10
Apr

New form of marijuana prompts warning from police

ALBANY COUNTY— There is a new form of pot on the block prompting a warning from police.
 
In the last few months authorities have made a handful of arrests-- including two arrests in Albany County just in the past two weeks-- connected to what is called marijuana wax.
 
Marijuana wax is a highly-potent form of the drug. Police say it is basically weed on steroids.
 
“It’s nasty stuff and it's messing people up," Albany County Sheriff Craig Apple said. “It’s like 90 percent THC. 90 percent pure."
 
Depending on how it is cooked it can look like rock candy or peanut brittle. Police say it is often hidden in lip balm containers.
 

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