Mexico

Wed
04
Nov

Non-smokers lead fight for Mexico pot legalization

Mexico City (AFP) - An unlikely group is leading the legal battle to break Mexico's marijuana ban: Two attorneys, an accountant and a social activist with no interest in actually growing or smoking pot.

Together, they form the Mexican Society for Responsible and Tolerant Personal Use, whose Spanish acronym spells "SMART," hoping the Supreme Court will rule in their favor on Wednesday.

While a victory for SMART would only allow the group to grow and consume its own pot, supporters say it could open the door for others to win similar cases and force Congress to consider legalizing marijuana.

"I have never smoked (marijuana), and I will never do it," Francisco Torres Landa, 50, told AFP from his law firm's office in an upscale Mexico City neighborhood.

Tue
03
Nov

MEXICO'S SUPREME COURT TO DECIDE IF MARIJUANA IS A CONSTITUTIONAL RIGHT

On Wednesday, the Supreme Court of Mexico will debate a highly-anticipated case concerning the constitutionality of barring the consumption and cultivation of marijuana for personal use in the country. 

The case, brought forward by the Mexican Society for Responsible and Tolerant Personal Use (SMART, in Spanish), argues that barring personal use of marijuana violates the constitutional right to freely develop one's personality. 

Tue
03
Nov

Mexico Is About To Decide If Access To Weed Is A Constitutional Right

MEXICO CITY, Mexico — Armando Santacruz, a 54-year-old businessman, had been trying to convince congressmen for nearly a year to get Mexico to legalize and regulate drugs, starting with marijuana. It was an uphill battle in a country where drug crime has tore at the fabric of society. In private, congressmen were open to the conversation, Santacruz said, but publicly, they appeared vehemently opposed to discussing the issue.

Tue
03
Nov

Mexico considers decriminalizing marijuana – thanks to U.S. example

For the last couple of years, Mexican legislator Fernando Belaunzarán has watched as millions of Americans in 24 states across the country have approved the legal use of marijuana – mostly as medicine but also for recreational use in Alaska, Colorado, Oregon and Washington.

As a deputy in the Congress, Belaunzarán has tried to get Mexico to do the same, but the country has stuck to laws banning the drug, although millions of tons of it is harvested in the country every year.

Only in recent months has the topic of legalization been taken up in earnest, discussed in courtrooms, in the corridors of power and in the mainstream media.

Mon
02
Nov

Six men accused of smuggling over a ton of marijuana plead no contest, receive two years of prison

On Friday, Alejandro Acosta, Jr, 26, Aaron Quintero, 23, Jesus Israelas Carrion Corrales, 51, Gonzalo Ruiz Quezara, 28, Victor Sandoval, 41, and Jose Burgueno Sanchez, 39, entered pleas of no contest to illegally importing 2800 pounds of marijuana into the United States on June 12.

All six men were immediately sentenced and received prison sentences of 2 years.

These charges stem from a multi-agency response to a Panga boat landing near Mill Creek in Big Sur in the early morning of June 12.

The United States Coast Guard first tracked the boat at sea by radar and started a ground response when the boat entered United States waters just after midnight and began a high speed run toward the Big Sur Coast.

Sat
31
Oct

6 men arrested for smuggling 2800 pounds of marijuana on boat

MONTEREY (BCN) — Six men were sentenced to two years in prison for smuggling 2,800 pounds of marijuana in a boat that landed off of the coast in Big Sur earlier this year, the Monterey County District Attorney’s Office announced Friday.

The men were identified as Alejandro Acosta Jr., 26, and Aaron Quintero, 23, both of Yuma, Arizona, and Jesus Israelas Carrion Corrales, 51, Gonzalo Ruiz Quezara, 28, Victor Sandoval, 41, and Jose Burgueno Sanchez, 39, of Mexico.

They all pleaded no contest to charges of transporting marijuana, possessing marijuana and conspiracy that stem from the discovery of a Panga boat that landed near Mill Creek in Big Sur during the early morning of June 12, prosecutors said.

Fri
30
Oct

Mexican families hoping for medicinal marijuana watch court

MONTERREY, Mexico (AP) — As Mexico's top court prepares to consider arguments that could open the door to the recreational use of marijuana, some families are hoping such a step could help make medicinal marijuana more accessible.

The parents of 8-year-old Graciela Elizalde of Monterrey have already seen a difference in their daughter since she began taking a marijuana extract recently. A federal judge gave them permission to import the marijuana oil.

Thu
29
Oct

Mexico's top court postpones marijuana hearing

Mexico's Supreme Court postponed on Wednesday a much-anticipated hearing on a citizen group's bid to legally smoke marijuana, a potential landmark case in a country beset by drug violence.

While dozens of legalization supporters gathered outside the court in the capital's historic center, a judicial official said the justices decided to delay the debate until next week or a later date.

The case was brought by the Mexican Society for Responsible and Tolerant Personal Use, whose Spanish acronym spells "SMART," which is seeking permission to grow and consume its own pot.

Wed
28
Oct

Activists hope Mexico top court breaks pot ban

Mexico's Supreme Court will debate on Wednesday a citizen group's bid to legally consume marijuana, an effort that activists hope will break pot prohibition in a country beset by drug violence.

The legal battle is being waged by the Mexican Society for Responsible and Tolerant Personal Use, whose Spanish acronym spells "SMART" and which argues that federal laws violate their fundamental right to smoke weed.

While the court's ruling would only apply to SMART, a decision in favor of the cannabis club could open the floodgates for others seeking to legally smoke marijuana in Mexico.

Wed
28
Oct

Landmark Case in Mexico's Supreme Court Could Pave the Way for Marijuana Legalization

On Wednesday, Mexico's Supreme Court will debate whether the prohibition of the consumption and cultivation of marijuana for personal use is unconstitutional. The Court will determine whether the prohibition of the consumption of marijuana -- and its cultivation for non-commercial ends -- violates the human right to the free development of one's personality. This landmark case could lead to the legalization of marijuana for recreational purposes if followed up with legislation.

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